• Polls
  • Enabling e-Learning
  • Do your personal and professional learning networks add equal value to your own learning - as much...

Do your personal and professional learning networks add equal value to your own learning - as much as traditional sources of PLD do?


Comments

  • Tessa Gray

    For some, teacher engagement in professional learning, means accessing traditional forms of PLD through localised school-based events (with set times), utilising external mentors, attending real-time conferences or long-term study and research. Sometimes this can be driven by strategic planning and policy PLD, rather than a personalised approach, yet research shows some of the most influential PLD is when the individual needs of adult learners are addressed (Online social networking and its impact on New Zealand educators’ p..., p.3, Karen Melhuish).

    As more and more schools understand the potential of e-learning as a positive catalyst for benefitting learners (in particularly mobile technologies and ubiquitous access to online resources via ultra-fast broadband), they also recognise the power of social technologies and online networks as drivers for personalised learning for adults. When you venture online, teachers are doing PLD for themselves – beyond themselves.

    What do you think? Do blended PLD opportunities offer the same benefits as traditional PLD?

  • Rebecca Ronald

    Betrer than trad pld because it can be undertaken when it suits, is ongoing, and is learning from others at the chalkface who tend to have a realistic point of view of teaching and practical suggestions.