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  • Derek Wenmoth published a blog post 7 Myths about BYOD
    Thought I'd share a couple of articles that might be of use to those in this group.  The first is titled "7 myths about BYOD" by Lisa Nielsen. In this she debunks a number of the arguments you often hear made about BYOD,...
    Comments
    • Ngaire Shepherd-Wills

      Both great articles. Definitely agree with all the "pros" mentioned- collaboration, engagement levels and more visible learning. Our home/ school partnerships are becoming stronger through our byod programme, especially when combined with other tools like our blogs and online modelling books. 

    • Paul Spicer

      I particularly like the point about 'student driven learning'. Particularly as students get older, more of their learning is going to come from their own study instead of just regurgitating what the teacher has told them. Teachers are now changing from being 'teaching what to learn' to 'teaching how to learn' which I think is brilliant.

    • Neil Penfold

      Our school is finally going to BYOD in 2017 after are a year-long pilot of Chromebooks.

      As with any new initiative,  we have those staff that are embracing the change and see it as a great opportunity, whilst others can only see challenges and problems.

      We are letting the students decide what they bring,  as long as it meets our basic spec's.  It will be interesting to see what they bring.  Our guess is a combination of iPads and Chromebooks.

      The main concerns and topics of discussion at the moment are some logistical ones around things like security and storage.

      Whilst this is obviously important and needs to be given careful consideration,  our focus is on improved teaching and learning.  We are currently re-working our learning framework,  and see our first context of the year being "Digital Citizenship". It will be interesting to see how the two combine,  and what type of positive outcomes we get for the students.

      There are some fears that our students will be even more stuck behind screens,  but as a leadership team we are determined to ensure that BYOD leads to improved pedagogy,  better engagement,  deeper thinking and high-quality student outcomes.

      I enjoyed reading the short article "7 myths about BYOD" by Lisa Nielsen - the point she makes about teachers and students working together to discover the "limitless possibilities that a tech-rich environment provides", and how it can enrich their learning, excites me.  Student voice and co-construction of learning contexts is strong in my current school,  and will be very interesting to see where the students take us on this learning journey.
      I was lucky to listen to Sugata Mitra speak at the recent ACEL conference.  What an inspirational and thought-provoking message he has. His research with "Schools in the Cloud" has led him to assert that, "Groups of children with access to the Internet can learn anything by themselves."  I would love to have the courage to try some of his ideas in our classrooms.  Certainly, we have the flexibility and freedom to do this at a junior high school level.
      Whilst we will have a strong e-pedagogy PD focus next year,  I like the point that the author made about teachers not having to be an expert on every app and every device that students bring to the table :"When the students bring in their own devices, then they are now the experts on the technology, and they can help each other. The teacher is then able to focus on the educational uses of the technology."  Surely is this the key to the whole argument for BYOD in our schools.
      Watch this space in 2017 ......
       
       
       
  • Vicki Stephens replied on the discussion topic BYOD Model
  • Rob Gunn replied on the discussion topic BYOD Model
  • Hamish McLean replied on the discussion topic BYOD Model
  • Carol-Lynn Hill replied on the discussion topic BYOD Model
  • Alison Taylor commented on the blog Avoiding digital distraction
    Hi All My take on this issue of digital distraction is that teachers will become more attuned to students who are disengaged due to digital distractions. As a teacher you are constantly monitoring student engagement in learning activities....
  • Abbie commented on the blog Avoiding digital distraction
    Admittedly the 'digital distraction' is a problem. We don't have byod but have about 1:2 ratio of devices in our school.  I whole-heartedly concur with the idea of greater student engagement in their learning, so they won't want to be...
  • Hamish McLean commented on the blog Avoiding digital distraction
    Awesome post Derek! I totally agree.  My position, is that as educators we should focus on engagement of our students, which results in students not wanting to waste time on digital devices,  and to do this we need to give students...
  • Derek Wenmoth published a blog post Avoiding digital distraction
    An oft expressed concern from teachers and parents when contemplating a class full of students using their own device is the risk of 'digital distraction' - i.e. "how will we know they're on-task, and not off using the device for something other...
    Comments
    • Abbie

      Admittedly the 'digital distraction' is a problem. We don't have byod but have about 1:2 ratio of devices in our school. 

      I whole-heartedly concur with the idea of greater student engagement in their learning, so they won't want to be distracted by other things on their device. I also acknowledge (as someone who is very easily digitally distracted) that devices allow a broad host of distractors in one easy place, without being easily noticed by the teacher. 

      I would, however, posit that digital distractions are just that: distraction in another form to the traditional (albeit more enticing than staring out the window). Do the students get just as distracted but in different, less obvious ways without devices? 

      The advantage of school devices is that you know what is on it. In my case I know that if they are off task they are still probably learning (as they tend to play the high-octane learning games).  

      I use the intermittent: show me your screens as a on-task encourager (I teach 7&8 year old semi-rural students). Additionally they know I'll check and that someone always dobbs them in if they are on the wrong game!

      Ultimately I guess a distractor is a distractor. Some are just less obvious than others. 

    • Alison Taylor

      Hi All

      My take on this issue of digital distraction is that teachers will become more attuned to students who are disengaged due to digital distractions.

      As a teacher you are constantly monitoring student engagement in learning activities. When wanting the whole class to engage together, there are times when you  ask for everyone to give their attention to an individual or group. There were obvious cues you would look for to ensure that everyone was focussed - eye contact, participation in activity. I think these cues work for digital and non digital situations.

      However, one thing with BYOD is that it can be very seductive and misleading for a teacher. A student can present as being intensely focussed on their screen, and can appear on task and can consequently be overlooked  - where a teacher assumes student engagement. In an environment where students are recording learning in a digital environment teachers need to be aware that what appeared to be engagement in a traditional pre-digital environment is in fact distraction.

      I agree with Abbie, teachers will develop routines to monitor student engagement in a BYOD environment  and a classroom culture of transparency - where students will monitor the learning engagement of each other. As I write this, I am also thinking about the importance of well planned lessons and pedagogical variety within  lessons that actively involve students in learning activities.

      Cheers

      Alison

       

    • Viki

      Hi Derek, you raise the very valid point that I am sure most of have either experienced or are concerned about. Interestingly a school I have just served a term at in the capacity of Acting Principal is in the beginning stages of introducing BYOD. I had the 'pleasure' of hosting the first community meeting for this and the questions around digital distraction, closely followed by digital safety (which I think are kind of linked) were the most prominent by far. It is quite easy to answer the digital safety issue by discussing the policy and digital citizenship expectations that are in place. It was really hard to convince families that it is when children understand and adhere to and act as responsible digital citizens that digital distraction is less likely to happen. As a staff we spoke of MLP (modern learning pedagogy as having significant responsibility for preventing digital distraction. So with this in mind it becomes clear that for digital devices to used as effective learning tools there is quite a lot of work to be done around these underlying issues. Having been fortunate to be quite instrumental in introducing BYOD at my last school I have learnt that 'slow and steady' is most important factor. Take time to develop a school wide cyber safety and digital citizenship policy. Take time to introduce these to the students an community. Take time to slowly integrate BYOD.

  • Blogger Steven Anderson shares some useful thoughts and links to collections of resources on BYOD. The things he mentions include: THE Journal lays out 7 myths and 7 truths around BYOD. At Edudemic, they’ve assembled a solid list of sites...
  • Mike Malcolm added a new discussion topic 1:1 and 1:2 Database
  • Lorraine Vickery added a new discussion topic BYOD Model
  • Gerard Macmanus added a new discussion topic eLearning class - tracking
  • Derek Wenmoth commented on the blog Character education for the digital age
    KIa ora Anjela - thanks for sharing that link. The article is entirely consistent with the key messages from Jason - these are the key messages we need to keep focusing on. Good one!
  • Anjela Webster commented on the blog Character education for the digital age
    Kia ora, Great blog Derek. Very timely. I thought I'd respond with a shout-out for the cause, in an article just published this week from BayBuzz, a Hawkes Bay publication. I was interviewed in December by Keith Newman, and he has penned a great...
  • Derek Wenmoth published a blog post Character education for the digital age
    As we prepare for the return of students to our classrooms, many teachers and schools will be considering the implications of their BYOD programmes and increased wireless access meaning more kids using digital devices in school.
    Comments
    • Anjela Webster

      Kia ora,

      Great blog Derek. Very timely. I thought I'd respond with a shout-out for the cause, in an article just published this week from BayBuzz, a Hawkes Bay publication. I was interviewed in December by Keith Newman, and he has penned a great article, shining credibility on this area of need - a conscious mindfulness onine - in otherwords, citizenship, safety, media literacies, development of online identities etc.

      http://www.baybuzz.co.nz/archives/7189/      image

      cheers

    • Derek Wenmoth

      KIa ora Anjela - thanks for sharing that link. The article is entirely consistent with the key messages from Jason - these are the key messages we need to keep focusing on. Good one!

  • Brenda Crozier published a blog post mLearning Capability Pilot Project
    Nathan Kerr and Robert Douglas, teachers at Howick College, participated in the mLearning Capability Pilot Project in 2010. The project explored the impact of mobile technologies on teaching and learning.
  • linda Ojala added a new discussion topic Year 3 Class BYOD