Log in

Frameworks to help teachers support Māori learners

  • Public
Started by Tessa Gray 26 Feb 2018 2:43pm () Replies (5)

As teachers we know relationships in teaching and learning are important, none-more-so than for Māori learners - so they can see themselves in their learning, their community and their achievement results. After all, you can't be what you see!

The NZ Codes and Standards for teacher and Tātaiako Cultural Competencies for Teachers of Māori Learners provide useful guidelines for developing cultural competencies, and go a long way to helping to build relationships as well as target teacher practice to improve outcomes for Māori students. 

Good news stories (like the ones below) and frameworks (Te Kotahitanga Effective Teaching Profile, Rongohia Te Hau) also help to identify actions and desired shifts in teacher practice, where; teachers are realising, and tamariki are reaching their full potential.

Rongohia Te Hau; measuring culturally responsive and relational pedagogy from EDtalks on Vimeo.


What are teachers doing at your school to deliberately change outcomes for Māori learners and what kind of shifts are you seeing already? We'd love to hear more.

Excellence awards  

Also see https://www.pmawards.education.govt.nz/finalists/


  • Mere Bennison (View all users posts) 27 Feb 2018 7:23pm ()

    I am carrying out a Teacher Inquiry about, "How digital technology can be implemented to support students that are discontinued  from reading recovery to make further progress with their literacy skills.?" In the class I teach in there is a target group of these discontinued learners, 7 in total who are all Maori. I have researched through my mindlab course and talking with teacher colleagues, resource teachers  into how digital technology impacts on literacy skills and taken this further into a teacher inquiry project as mentioned already. My teaching-learning focus plan is to set the target group up with the use of a reading app called, 'Front Row' and trial this with them for a term. I will gather pre and post data to compare and analyse to find out if there has been a positive impact for these students. I believe having engagement, motivation and innovation will have a positive outcome for these students.

  • Tessa Gray (View all users posts) 01 Mar 2018 10:13am ()

    Kia ora @Mere.Bennison, thank you for sharing this exciting project, I'd be very interested in hearing how this goes. From my understanding Reading Recovery is a very structured programme, so this will be a jump from 'books' to a digital format. I'd also love to know what you're hoping the students will take away from using the 'Front Row' app?

    You're so right about engagement and motivation, my own son is reluctant reader himself. We've now loaded up ePlatform on our iPad at home as well - a digital library app (free) from Tauranga libraries. He plays around with the size of the text and really enjoys reading that way, but is still reluctant to be a self-motivated reader **sigh**. 

    I'm just thinking (beyond the digital tools), about other influential variables as well - like: teacher input (relationships) and guidance and what learners will do with their reading skills - ie: comprehension, application, sharing new knowledge, teaching each other, working together etc. I'm also wondering about accessibility. ie: access to the digital resources as well as motivation and relevance of the material/content (can Māori learners see themselves or relate to the content) and what are the levels of access to digital resources at school and at home. 

    You might find Sam McNeil's review of a literacy research project focused on asking the question, "Does the use of Learning Tools improve literacy outcomes, with both reading and writing for students?" useful too Mere? No doubt you could contact Sam directly if you had any questions around this. The VLN link above also touches on local research in terms of accessibility of digital tools for NZ children (at school and at home). 

    Are there any other ideas you've been thinking about too that you'd like to tease out further in this teacher inquiry?

    Also see: Education Counts digital technologies and literacy research

  • Tessa Gray (View all users posts) 13 Mar 2018 3:50pm ()

    On Monday this week, there was a news item on TV about the need to teach Māori history including the historical and bloody land wars our ancestors and tipuna had to endure.

    Rosalie singingWe've long recognised teachers are essential in raising achievement for Māori students and at the heart of this, we cannot ignore our children's culture, language and identity. What if you're a teacher (like myself) that feels the need for more support, to help make this happen? Great news, there are rich curriculum resources available!

    I'm coming a little bit late to the party here, but am LOVING this resource, Te Takanga o te Wā - Māori history in the NZ Curriculum. The ideas in Teaching material section (Yrs 1-8), are well written and easy for teachers to trial, adopt or modify.

    The resource also helps us ask,

    • What does the history look like around our kura/school or community?
    • Who are the story tellers and historians granted guardianship to pass on those stories that are part of our student's whānau, hapu, iwi?
    • How can place-based learning become a focal point for rich student inquiry, so tamariki can celebrate language, culture and identity as confident learners?

    I'd love to hear what you think of this or if/how you're using this resource with your students smiley

  • Tessa Gray (View all users posts) 13 Mar 2018 4:11pm ()

    Oh this is also very cool: Te Reo Māori place map of Aotearoa  https://www.andrewdc.co.nz/2018/03/13/te-reo-maori-map-of-aotearoa-new-zealand/

Join this group to contribute to discussions.