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Gamification

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Started by Tracy Prout 09 Sep 2017 11:36am () Replies (12)

Is anyone using aspects of gamification successfully in their classroom? I am interested in how effective it is for motivating primary aged boys for a Teacher Inquiry Project. Your thoughts would be much appreciated. 

Replies

  • Tracy Prout (View all users posts) 15 Sep 2017 1:14pm ()

    Hi Darren,

    I have done 'some' reading and, to me, some design elements of "gamification" already existed in schools long before the term gamification came into existence. Points systems and house systems have been around for ages so I am really just satisfying a curiosity around what 'other' elements of game design might motivate my boys (all of whom are avid lovers of video games). I am really just beginning this journey of inquiry and would like to learn more.

  • Tracy Prout (View all users posts) 15 Sep 2017 9:44am ()

    Hi Natasha,

    I am interested in design elements I can use rather than IT tools. I have plenty of tools that the boys are using but I want to find a way to increase their motivation to complete tasks in a non gaming context. I was motivated by a visit to special education classroom that was using Class Dojo but have heard some very negative views on that particular programme. I then did a bit of reading and became interested in the idea of setting up something (supported by game design elements) for my boys. My email address is tonyandtracyprout@gmail.com - anything you can send me would be greatly appreciated. 

    Tracy :)

  • Natasha Ormond (View all users posts) 12 Sep 2017 4:15pm ()

    Hi Darren smiley

    Do you mind me asking as to why you would question whether gamification should be used in the classroom?  I would love a different perspective as most of my readings have been pro-gamification.

  • Darren (View all users posts) 12 Sep 2017 12:47pm ()

    If you are talking about gamification as Natasha mentioned then you should question whether it should be used at all imho. If you are talking about using gaming in the classroom then the latter definitely has worth - for any student.

  • Natasha Ormond (View all users posts) 12 Sep 2017 11:52am ()

    Hi Tracy,

    In terms of gamification do you mean using game design elements in a non-gaming context as described by Deterding, Dixon, Khaled and Nacke (2011)? Or more the use of IT tools in a gaming context?  If you mean the later, I have just finished a literature review for Mindlab on the subject of how gamification affects student engagement that I can share with you.  I am also completing a teacher inquiry on this at the moment and am looking at implementing it next term.  

    Let me know what you need. :)

  • Tessa Gray (View all users posts) 12 Sep 2017 11:20am ()

    Wow Tony you've done it again - a wealth of people, knowledge, resources, stories and ideas (post conference and all). Thank you for sharing, more than cuppa needed with this lot Tracy smiley.

    Enabling e-Learning is also hosting the following webinar next week, which will be recorded if you can't make it. Feel free to tell your friends.

    smiley LIVE WEBINAR: 3D gaming and virtual reality, 20 Sept, 3:45-4:45 pm

    Virtual realityLast term we looked at how some secondary students from Pakuranga College were designing and creating using robotics, 3D printers and coding. This time we look at how they are learning through 3D gaming and virtual reality. Sounds out there right? Come along and find out more. REGISTRATIONS OPEN NOW! 

    This webinar will also be supported by a thread in the Technologies group and hosted in Adobe Connect.

  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 10 Sep 2017 12:04am ()

    Tracy 

    talk to Rachel Bolstad NZCER

    talk to Diana Grace Morris - Ridgeway and AUT

    tak to Leanne Stubbing

    talk to Dan Milward - Gamefroot

    talk to Matt Richards - Hinatore

    talk to Catherine Hill - Wellington High School

    talk to Micahael Harcourt - VUW

    talk to Andrew Savage - Wellington High School

    talk to MindLab - either in Auckland, Gisborne or Petone

    Report for Royal Society on Caltex Fuel Your School funding from Tony Cairns Wellington High School Te Akorangi Pai

     

  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 09 Sep 2017 11:56pm ()

    Starkey et al - Children's use of digital technologies (1) (1).pdf DGMorris #G4Lconf17 Presentation Slide_Google Slide.pptx PD CST 2015 29  November  2015 (2) (1).docx Gate and PLD from Tony Cairns 2017 CST PD (2).docx GATE 2017 Calendar (1).pdf Mahuki - Proposals for Re Development of Te Papa from Tony Cairns 2016 (1) (1).docx

    Links to my Files above

    Gaming in Secondary School Science

     

     

    1. Gaming in Science Classes, The importance of Play,

    2. Gaming in Preschool and Primary,

    3. The cost of trying innovative play based learning in NZ

    4. Secondary Schools and Parental, peer and professional responses to innovations

    5. The role of startups in game design in NZ schools and secondary education,

    6. The attitude that gaming is fun and learning through play is awesome,

    7. My search for educational Games

    8. The integration of Games into Assessments, Differentiated Learning (EdPerfect) LEOTC and VR, AuR and MR at Te Papa - Hinatore and Mahuki.

    9. The education for gaming in NZ (https://docs.google.com/document/d/1F2s0hhS50Pb3rhBuR4TAW8pTdHqPPS-uzygVkDMaIuM/edit)

    10. The short courses game constructions,

    11. The use of board games in teaching science at WHS, Green Screen projections and Freeze Frame modelling to make games at WHS to teach Science concepts,

    12. Gaming the Solar System, DNA and Heart dissections at WHS etc.

    13. The use of early gaming systems to show genetic concepts - second life's genetic islands, lethal homozygous recessives,

    14. Gaming in Art and History, Card Games showing Gaming from Wellington Gaming Suppliers and how the can help teach science innovation and technology -

    15. Augmented reality markers and cards in games.

    16. The Startup Game from the last Startup weekend,

    17. The link between Gaming and Big Data through GovHack, T

    18. The Gaming of the Genomes and Genealogy through the National Geneographic Project

    19. Game Design flourishes with Gamefroot, NZCER and Caltex Fuel Your School funding

       

      Caltex Fuel Your School is helping fund a top term of game designers to work with students at Wellington High School (WHS). Game Design Workshops are organized by local EdTech guru and Game Designer Dan Milward from Gamefroot and Mahuki, Te Papa's own innovation hub. Dan is working with Rachel Bolstad from the New Zealand Council for Educational Research NZCER.  

       

      Rachel and Dan's time, extensive experience of gaming design and educational research are helping our students design digital games - with learning through making our top priority. Students are following industry processes to create their own games based on local and global issues that are of interest to young people.

       

      Through the game design process, WHS students are challenged to generate and test their own game concepts, learn how to give and receive constructive feedback, work in teams to draw on each other's strengths, talents and interests, and think critically about how games can be used to educate, inspire, and inform.

       

      Students will be taking the skills they have learned and the games they have designed to startups, seminars and other students in Wellington and beyond.

       

      We are grateful for the support of these partners and Caltex Fuel Your School for this programme

       

      Images are here

       

      https://photos.google.com/u/1/share/AF1QipOGUXR6JvIt-m0gYGNaY6hSyAqV-GLAanwpnvjl9ry3VFmZq9KZTwoKoRlyPHCdsA?key=LVdPMVU3M2tMbEd3aGppMlNwZE5aRU9lblVoNVF3

       

      for more information contact:


      Rachel Bolstad
      Senior Researcher
      New Zealand Council for Educational Research NZCER
      Phone + 64 4 802 1382 Email rachel.bolstad@nzcer.org.nz

       

      Tony Cairns

      Teacher

      Wellington High School,  Te Kura Tuarua o Taraika ki Pukeahu,

      Mobile: + 64 22 653 4021 Email:tony.cairns@whs.school.nz

      Dan Milward
      Game Designer

      Gamefroot
      Mobile: + 64 21 449 901 Email dan@gamefroot.com

       

      Caltex Fuel Your School funds leadership programme Upwards at High

       

      Caltex has granted Upwards Leadership Programme funding to help our WHS Students to find their roots and make 'a place to stand' on the marae at Taraika.

       

      Upwards is a term-long leadership program for high school students designed by educationalist and digital instructional designer Christina Curley.

       

      Upwards aims to empower, uplift and equip students with the skills they’ll need to become more resilient adults, and become the heroes of their own lives.

       

      Starting with a pōwhiri to formally open the programme, it gives us a place to stand, a turangawaewae on our marae. Sessions are held in the Wharenui on the marae to further foster connection and a sense of belonging.

       

      Upwards uses a tikanga Māori framework of leadership, Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey and the principles of education program Te Kotahitanga. Leadership, self-knowledge and communication skills are interspersed with practical life skills to prepare students for life after high school and beyond. Sessions use a mixture of kinaesthetic and auditory learning to engage and meet the needs of Māori and Pacific learners, though the programme is open to all.

       

      Upwards aims to meet students where they are, and create a promising future together. We are grateful for the support of Caltex Fuel Your School Grant for this programme.

       

      Images are here

      --

       

      https://photos.google.com/u/1/share/AF1QipOGUXR6JvIt-m0gYGNaY6hSyAqV-GLAanwpnvjl9ry3VFmZq9KZTwoKoRlyPHCdsA?key=LVdPMVU3M2tMbEd3aGppMlNwZE5aRU9lblVoNVF3

       

      for more information contact:

      Christina Curley

      Founder

      Upwards Limited

      Phone: 021 027 90138 Email: christina.curley@enspiral.com

       

      Tony Cairns

      Teacher

      Wellington High School,  Te Kura Tuarua o Taraika ki Pukeahu,

      Mobile: 022 653 4021 Email:tony.cairns@whs.school.nz

       







       
  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 09 Sep 2017 11:38pm ()

    Gamification of Education - CoreEd Breakfast 8/5/15

    What are your favourite digital and non-digital games?

    Why are we interested in games and the future of education?

    What could future learning look like - and why?

    What kind of changes will we need to make?

    How can I research The Future of Education?

    How do we move from best practice to next practice?

     

    Teachers are active future builders - forge new territory, try new things. We’re creating the future, not just waiting for it to happen.

    Supporting future-oriented learning and teaching - a New Zealand perspective

    Digital storytelling; narratives; visual metaphors; scriptwriting; arts-based research methodologies; RP workshops; games!

     

    Serotonin and dopamine released - imagine if learning felt as good as kissing? Would anyone ever miss a class? Games like Candy Crush use latest research and gameplay mechanisms to trigger positive feedback in the brain.

    Speaker is from http://make.gamefroot.com - making game design easy and accessible. Teaches coding and game development. Powered by Google’s Blockly; comparable to Scratch. Publishes to JavaScript.

     

    From here

    To here...

    Games for learning

    Games to transform learning

    L and T as game users

    … as game creators

    Games in schools

    Games-based schools

    What’s possible now

    What might be possible in the future

     

    Research around games in learning is fragmented. An emerging and fragmented field. Many ways to approach research. Research not always asking the right questions - a bit vague, e.g. ‘can games improve learning?’

     

    Prof. James Paul Gee - education & literacy professor.

    Games can be: authoring tools; content; simulation; context; point of view; text; reflection

    http://www.instituteofplay.org/work/projects/games-as-guide/

     

    Barriers (from US study, n=488): Cost; time; lack of tech; not sure where to find quality games; hard to find games that fit the curriculum.

     

    Who benefits most from games? Takeuchi and Vaala (2014): 99% of all students, but especially low-performing students.

     

    See Claire Amos ‘Game Over’ module/blog at Hobsonville Point secondary.

     

    Five genres/games that show the diversity of what games can be:

    1. Sandbox-style games. Open-ended, no specific goals, all about exploration:

      • e.g. Minecraft, Second Life

    2. Never Alone

      • Created by Native Alaskan community

      • Immerses you in Inupiat physical and spiritual worldview, stories, language

      • See also: Thomas Was Alone which builds on feelings of empathy and interdependence

    3. Bounden

      • A game that guides you to dance with a friend

      • Play on mobile devices

      • Puts individuality and diversity of the core of the game mechanic

    4. Citizen Science

      • Funded by National Science Foundation; hopes to lead to societal transformation

      • Adventure/puzzle game where player is taken back through time to stop pollution of a local lake

      • Educational game design principles

    5. Fort McMoney

      • A ‘game documentary’

      • Virtual representation of a real place, located in Canada’s oil sands.

      • Everyone in the game is real

      • Conduct an investigation and discover the project’s main economic, environmental, and social issues.

     

    How far could this go? What about a games-based school?

     
  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 09 Sep 2017 11:37pm ()

    GATE at HIGH in 2017 by Tony Cairns (CST)

     

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1F2s0hhS50Pb3rhBuR4TAW8pTdHqPPS-uzygVkDMaIuM/edit?usp=sharing

     

    Gaming

    • The use of board games in teaching History at WHS, (See Andrew Savage and Michael Harcourt)

    • Games + The Future of Education (NZCER) (Conference funded by Caltex Fuel Your School and WHS)

    • Gaming in Science Classes, The importance of Play, (See EdchatNZ, TeachmeetNZ, LoopEd and BioLive)

    • The cost of trying innovative play based learning in NZ ( 4Ps: Professional, Personal, Public, Parents)

    • The role of startups in game design in NZ schools and secondary education, (see EdTech, NZCER)

    • The Startup Game from the last Startup weekend,at BizDojo, on StartUps the Game (See YouTube)

    • The integration of Games into Assessments, Differentiated Learning (EdPerfect, Andrew Savage, WHS)

    • LEOTC and VR, AuR and MR at Te Papa - Hinatore and Mahuki.- Links to Te Puke and other Schools

    • The education for gaming in NZ

    • The Gamefroot/NZCER workshops at WHS, The short courses game constructions, (NZCER, Gamefroot)

    • Green Screen projections and Freeze Frame modelling to make games at WHS to teach Science concepts,

    • Gaming the Solar System, DNA and Heart dissections, Genomes and Genealogy through the NGP

    • Card Games teaching science innovation and technology, Augmented reality markers and cards in games.

    • Rachel Bolstad,  Games + The Future of Education (NZCER) Te Papa, Games for Learning

    • The link between Gaming and Big Data through GovHack, 2017 (see below)

     

    Fun, work and play: gaming, teaching and learning

    1. What does Fun have to do with Learning?

    2. What can we learn from Play?

    3. How do we Learn in ways we always remember?

    4. Where does Learning begin?

    5. How can we nurture learning in ourselves and in our students?

    6. How can we make learning more fun for ourselves and others?

    7. What are the impediments to making learning fun?

    8. Which are the enablers for making learning Fun?

    9. Where does Gaming fit into learning?

    10. What Games Motivate you to learn?

     

     
     

    Appendix 12

    Te Papa Collaboration trials VR and eLearning with WHS

    WHS Year 10 Students are working via Digital Computer Linkups with distant NZ schools to solve a multidimensional, virtual reality (MDVR) physics problem at Hinatore - Te Papa's Hi Tech Learning Lab.

     

    Jessie Robieson, Te Papa's Learning Innovation Specialist, described it as a "programme based around using  HTC vive and SculptrVR to create a collaborative, geo-remote, physics puzzle with a group of year 10's separated in time and space."  Next Thursday  afternoon our WHS students team will be issued a physics challenge that they need to collaborate on to achieve success running against the clock. We wish them well in the first VR inter college physics competition.

     

    Video here​

    image IMG_2924.MOV

    Video is here​

    image IMG_2924.MOV

    Images coming soon

    --

    Tony Cairns

    Science Teacher, GATE Coordinator, Digital Media Resource Specialist, Future Problem Solver

    Wellington High School,  Te Kura Tuarua o Taraika ki Pukeahu,

    249 Taranaki Street, P O Box 4035, Wellington 6140, NEW ZEALAND

    Mobile: 022 653 4021 Phone: 04 385 8911 Fax: 04 802 7670 Email: tony.cairns@whs.school.nz

     

     

    VIRTUAL REALITY

    image

    WHS Year 10 Students are working with other schools to solve a multidimensional, virtual reality (MDVR) physics problem at Hinatore – Te Papa’s Hi-Tech Learning Lab.

    Jessie Robieson, Te Papa’s Learning Innovation Specialist, described it as a “programme based around using  HTC vive and SculptrVR to create a collaborative, geo-remote, physics puzzle with a group of Year 10 students separated in time and space.” Our students just called it fun as they rocketed, ricocheted and rappelled around the immersive 3D hyperspace. They mastered the (VR) weapons, tools and hang glider functions effortlessly during the hands-on workshop.

    Next, our students will be issued a physics challenge that they need to collaborate on to achieve involving a giant hollowed out obelisk, a range of rockets and a strange flying ball that can assume infinite, minimal or no space at all.

     

     

     


     

     

     

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e-Learning: Technologies

e-Learning: Technologies

Where we explore how different technologies can support learning.