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Posting photos of children online

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Started by Nathaniel Louwrens 04 Mar 2016 8:03am () Replies (10)

NetSafe shared this article on their Facebook page this morning:

French parents 'could be jailed' for posting children's photos online

It states, 

French parents are being warned to stop posting pictures of children on social networks in case their offspring later sue them for breaching their right to privacy or jeopardising their security.

This is something that I have discussed a few times with my wife and a former colleague of mine. Not about the possibility of being sued, but thinking about what choices the children have about what gets shared online by their parents. What control do the children have over their own privacy and their own digital footprint when others are posting the photos?

Should we be giving our children more say in what gets posted online?

Mr Delcroix said: “We often criticise teenagers for their online behaviour, but parents are no better.”

He argued that people should think about how their children will feel later in life about images of them as infants or adolescents being posted on Facebook or other social networks. “Children at certain stages do not wish to be photographed or still less for those photos to be made public,” he told Le Figaro newspaper.

It might be interesting to ask your students what they think? Do they feel they have control over what gets posted about them? Do they see it as an issue?

What about in regards to what is shared from school? Often parents sign the forms saying that it's okay to share photos or work of their children. Should the children be signing these too? And what if they change their minds?


Check out the Digital Citizenship resources on Enabling e-Learning.

Replies

  • Philippa Nicoll Antipas (View all users posts) 14 Mar 2016 2:04pm ()

    I gave a 'keynote' to a group of Year 9 students who were embarking on a two day symposium where they were exploring online and offline communities. It was entitled 'Google Yourself'. It was amazing how many of the young people found hits in Google - particularly when we targeted the images search.

    I prefer the notion of a digital 'tattoo' rather than a 'footprint' and think parents should consider this carefully in relation to their children. I can see that it will be entirely possible for children growing up now to have every personal occasion posted online - even from when they are in utero!

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Digital Citizenship

Digital Citizenship

A group to support schools help their students, staff and whānau become digital citizens