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Sustainable Strategies: Integrating e-learning, leadership inquiry and classroom practice | Kōrero 14 2015

Resources and Discussion through the Years

Use these resources and Korero to gain a clear picture of leadership of e-learning planning over the past three years.

  • Using the e-Learning Planning Framework – this is useful in guiding us through the use of the e-LPF
  • The e-Learning Planning Framework (eLPF) online tool is live for all schools/kura on the Enabling E-Learning  (EEL) site with full instructions and support material. Once you have created your account you can then manage your schools surveys within the e-Learning Planning Framework online tool. The MMeLPF /te Rangitukutuku (Maori Medium eLPF) tool is also available as a download on EEL.
  • Korero from Previous Years

>>> 2014 Integration of Technologies across the School Community – Korero 14

>>> 2013 Leadership and Strategic Planning for e-Learning – Korero 14

>>> 2012 The e-Learning Planning Framework – how and Why to Use it? – Korero 16

It will be best for all new posts to be in this thread so they are easier to follow.

2015 Korero 14: Sustainable strategies: integrating e-learning, leadership inquiry and classroom practice

During the last three years the discussion in this strategic Korero has focused on leadership learning about the e-Learning Planning Framework and how to use it. (See just above)

We think this year’s NAPP cohort is stepping past this level of understanding and needs to focus on teaching/learning transformations that are going on as school leaders apply inquiry learning and use the e-LPF. 

Professional learning using teacher inquiry

In this Enabling e-Learning video, Chris Allen, principal of Sacred Heart Girls' College, and Mike Wilson, ICT cluster director, share why they chose to use a teacher inquiry model as a focus for professional learning and why that approach has been so successful.

 

2015 Korero 14

 

Leadership inquiry and use of the e-Learning Planning Framework should fit well together.

  • Use the elements of leadership inquiry and the e-Learning Planning Framework to support discussion on how they have in specific instances brought or are bringing about transformative change to teaching and or leadership practice
  • Explain how specific parts of the inquiry cycle, shown below, and the e-Learning Planning Framework have worked together for you and your school

Inquiry cycle

 Source: Inclusive Education Guides for Schools  - original source Timperley: Teacher Professional Learning and Development.

Follow the link and look under Plan and Lead Inclusive Practices, Transitions and Pathways.


 

Also see:

Replies

  • Judy Richards (View all users posts) 29 Oct 2015 9:40am ()

    Korero 14

    Engagement of learners and/or teachers in new learning experiences is the part in an inquiry model that can be overlooked.

     It is  all very well implementing a BYOD school, have classrooms with devices available, but we need to consider if the device is fit for the purpose of our leaners and if the staff have been given sufficient ‘playtime’ with the device and PLG to support the shift in pedagogy.

    Time must be given to ensure that the teacher is competent in the use of the device and has had the time and professional development to learn how to integrate this into their inquiry model.  The teacher needs not be an expert- but aware of the capabilities of the device they are using and the possible resource. I totally agree that there needs to be a shared language of how we teach and the student’s involvement in their learning.

    Parents and the community need to be consulted on the schools policy and be able to contribute to the decisions made.  What suits our school may not suit the school down the road.  It does not matter in my option what platform is used, it’s just another skill developed by the user and a different forum to share with.

    I have been working with our schools literacy advisor in developing an inquiry model that allows differentiation, but a clear structure.  This allows our priority learners to own their learning and move their understanding forwards in a negotiated direction, but allowing our more capable learners to synthesise their understanding.  I have seen an increase in engagement using this model in my classes, with my students.  I am yet to see any data driven results- but I will keep you posted! 

  • Judy Richards (View all users posts) 29 Oct 2015 9:41am ()

    Korero 14

    Engagement of learners and/or teachers in new learning experiences is the part in an inquiry model that can be overlooked.

     It is  all very well implementing a BYOD school, have classrooms with devices available, but we need to consider if the device is fit for the purpose of our leaners and if the staff have been given sufficient ‘playtime’ with the device and PLG to support the shift in pedagogy.

    Time must be given to ensure that the teacher is competent in the use of the device and has had the time and professional development to learn how to integrate this into their inquiry model.  The teacher needs not be an expert- but aware of the capabilities of the device they are using and the possible resource. I totally agree that there needs to be a shared language of how we teach and the student’s involvement in their learning.

    Parents and the community need to be consulted on the schools policy and be able to contribute to the decisions made.  What suits our school may not suit the school down the road.  It does not matter in my option what platform is used, it’s just another skill developed by the user and a different forum to share with.

    I have been working with our schools literacy advisor in developing an inquiry model that allows differentiation, but a clear structure.  This allows our priority learners to own their learning and move their understanding forwards in a negotiated direction, but allowing our more capable learners to synthesise their understanding.  I have seen an increase in engagement using this model in my classes, with my students.  I am yet to see any data driven results- but I will keep you posted! 

  • Tessa Gray (View all users posts) 29 Oct 2015 4:10pm ()

    Here's a story currently under construction that some of you might be interested in. It takes shape in a Leadership Inquiry form, Part 1 is here: Leading learning and responsive PLD at Ngatea Primary School | A leadership inquiry which, 

    "...introduces the future-focused ideas and clarifies the school’s special character and perceived needs. The following posts will then disclose the inquiry intentions, interventions and outcomes for teachers’ learning at Ngatea Primary School."

    You might recognise some commonalities with your own inquiry goals? We'd love to hear your thoughts.

  • Anna Watkin (View all users posts) 30 Oct 2015 1:01pm ()

    Our school is currently going through the process of change from traditional single cell classrooms into a collaborative MLE environment- this process started about 3 years ago with PLD on shifting teachers pedagogy, we have been working with a LwDT facilitator on integration of devices within classrooms, moving on from just the 'substitution' model into a more creative use. We changed the running of our school into a 'stage not age' model focussed on reading results as highlighted as a need through a previous ERO report. Thus giving teachers a smaller band of groups to work with in reading, we then introduced another PLD on personalised learning 2 years ago and have worked with a facilitator on developing programmes around this, all of this has happened prior to our movement into an MLE. In term 2 of this year we moved 3 teachers into our existing hall while building work commenced- this quickly grew to 4 teachers and now in Term 4 we have just introduced a 5th teacher and her class into the hall- these teachers are working together from a google-docs platform to deliver an integrated curriculum inclusive of IT, and personalisation. We use the Daily 5 and Daily 3 approaches for literacy and numeracy and have goal setting and visual displays as our assessment targets for all individuals. Our teachers and management last night presented to the parents about why and how we have moved to this approach that one teacher has said 'I will never go back to single cell teaching, this is the way forward' we have received positive feedback from not only our school community, students involved but national and international visitors. The e-learning planning framework has been at the core of this and the 'Teaching and Learning' section is used by each teacher to develop inquiries for appraisal purposes. We are eagerly anticipating the completion of our new build so all the practice over the last 3 years can be put into teaching and learning.

  • Katie Fisher (View all users posts) 31 Oct 2015 2:56pm ()

    We are using a ‘teaching as inquiry’ model to track two target students in each class. Each teacher assesses and determines students’ needs, sets term goals and monitors these goals fortnightly using of a range of evidence. We discuss these students in our team meetings and occasionally staff meetings using the Ariki model of questions and the coaching techniques I have learnt on NAPP.

    All this is beginning to foster a sense of teacher inquiry with teachers reflecting and making changes. Alongside this we are reviewing our curriculum. We have reviewed our vision and have made some in-roads into re-visiting the key competencies. We want to see the key competencies at the heart of our teaching and learning but many of our teachers are just at the beginning of the learning curve with the idea of ‘flipped’ curriculum – KCs, then curriculum areas. It does take a bit of courage to let the children have more say and choice.

    The e-learning planning framework is yet to be added into this mix but having scanned through I can see that as a school we are further along in some areas than in others.  This would be a really useful tool for us to gain the bigger picture and then hone in on some focus areas. Perhaps it also could help our teachers further appreciate the concept of student agency – particularly the section on ‘Control and choice’ under Learning and Teaching.

    On a slightly different note: A colleague of mine recently expressed the thought that BYOD policies had the potential to place our children in danger when travelling to and from school. Perhaps some in the community, knowing that children are carrying around digital technology, might take this opportunity to indulge in a little theft.

  • Penny Kinsella (View all users posts) 31 Oct 2015 4:45pm ()

    Over the past two terms we have been planning a BYOD trial for 2016. This was initiated via a staff committee and, as acting Principal, I was keen to be a supportive and enabling leader. Hooking in with our BOT and our IT manager we were able to support teachers to develop their own skills and find out how this works in other schools. One thing that was inspiring was sending two IT Committee members and a BOT member to a Manaiakalani open day. This led to a proposal for a BYOD trial  from the committee in time for the Principal's return. Another Manaiakalani trip ensued, this time for Senior Management and another BOT member, and the planning phase was all on!

     

    IT Committee teachers and other volunteers including me (back in my normal DP role) engaged in some Office 365 training and then trialled a number of initiatives in their classrooms like Cahoots, OneNote Class Notebooks, Twitter, etc. Following this we shared our ideas in several "market days" in the teacher professional learning slot - very well received. The Principal and BOT ran a parents IT consultation on the first day of the holidays and now we are in trial planning mode!

     

    Our IT initiative will be included as the third part of our teacher professional learning. This year we focussed on developing inquiry skills for all teachers using the aim of improving the reading comprehension levels of target students in Years 9 & 10. The development of IT skills for all of our teachers to support these initiatives will be supported by having the seed teachers in the BYOD trial sharing their learning with the staff through our TPL.

  • Geoff Childs (View all users posts) 05 Nov 2015 8:30am ()

    It's great to hear you using "market days" as a strategy for engaging staff, providing choice and accountability. The consultation process also sounds thorough and robust Penny. I am curious re the seed teachers and  the BYOD trial. Do the teachers self select and is this the same for the students?

  • Andrea Robertson (View all users posts) 01 Nov 2015 8:55am ()

    Sustainable Strategies: Integrating e-learning, leadership inquiry and classroom practice

    It has been interesting reading about others journeys and experiences.  At my school we have been using the e-learning planning framework to plan ahead and move forward for the past 4 years.  It was interesting surveying our teaching team in 2012 and seeing that we put ourselves at ‘engaging’ when we were in reality at ‘emerging’. Now 3 years on and having done  professional learning around e-learning and using digital tools we are at ‘engaging moving to extending’.  So we actually went ‘backwards’ but this has come about from having a better understanding of where we were at and where we are heading.   

    At the start of the year we introduced 1:2 chromebooks in our senior classes and 1:3 in our middles.  We are on a LwDT contract and our whole staff went to the GAFE conference in CHCH in the first holidays.  The whole team ‘buy in’, enthusiasm, collaboration etc has taken time to develop and grow.  We used to save to ‘T-drive and use our school server a lot but now everything is created and saved on google drive and we are heading to MUSAC edge at the start of next year.  All these new ‘ways of working’ have been introduced with support, PLD and careful consideration about what devices to buy.  

    Others on this feed have discussed improvement in outcomes for students and while we haven’t yet seen a dramatic shift in student achievement that we can attribute solely to the use of digital tools, we have seen an increase in students collaborating and giving feedback to each other and a lift in student motivation and engagement.  Teachers are equally collaborating more and are motivated and engaged in the use of digital tools and online resources to support their teaching and learning. Moving forward we are looking at digital citizenship and aligning our online values with our school values.

     In my class in term 2 we got rid of all of the desks and have utilised different spaces and areas in the room to work in.  While the room is physically an ILE I would like to continue investigating/trialling approaches to learning that foster student led learning, increased independence and self management.  I had the opportunity to visit 3 schools in Christchurch in term 2 that are ILE's and was interested in what I saw happening.  Teachers were honest about the barriers and struggles as well as the benefits and positives.  I have been reading and following discussions around ILE's and can see that there is such diversity in approaches.  Schools with all the modern gear that are still teaching in single cell approaches and schools with no modern furniture that are well down the pathway to innovative learning programmes.  With many years of teaching under my belt I have seen many different styles that have come and gone over the years starting from my own experience as a child of the 80's with open plan teaching, Prashnig's learning styles, blooms and MI's, intergration and inquiry.  As a profession we are so good at reflecting on practice, looking at what works best for our learners, adapting and innovating in programmes.  I do wonder how sustainable this latest approach will last... already MLE's have become ILE's. 

    My personal hope is that we will reach a point where we decide to increase the amount of time we spend teaching innovative and creative learning in areas such as technology (curriculum not devices) music, visual arts, drama, dance, health and pe, science and social sciences.  That we might start to teach children in a strengths based way discovering their talents and interests and developing these.  Fitting maths, reading and writing around the above mentioned learning areas and not the other way around.  Then perhaps we will have truly innovative and creative young people who are able to adapt, contribute, innovate, enterprise and lead the way.

     

  • Sally Hart (View all users posts) 01 Nov 2015 10:51am ()

    During the year, I have been completing a separate inquiry into making learning visible. This is not just to do with technology. However, technology can amplify the process of making learning visible. I have written a reflection on this in relation to blogging. I think an important aspect of leadership around technology is it starts with the why? and that we model the fact that we are learners around this as well.

    Process over outcomes…Making learning visible in multiple ways….via blogging -teachers, learners, comments and authenticity

    I love this image on technology and the “right and wrong learning outcomes”. For me this is an extremely important consideration for teaching and learning. Yes technology is shifting faster than ever before, yes we must engage ourselves and our learners in use of technology, e-learning, blended learning, whatever we may call it. Yes we must ensure equality for all, all learners need access to devices of some sort. BUT…… we need to think about all this with a pedagogical hat on!! Why comes first? What is the intended outcome? What are we wanting to learn? Why will this tool allow this? Not just a tool for the sake of a tool.

    Therefore to blog or not to blog is not the question!

    Why to blog????

    There is multiple reasons that I believe that a blog can be a powerful tool for learning…

    Firstly I believe that a blog allows gathering of naturally occurring evidence of learning, where the process of learning is gathered over time. Where the growth in the learning journey is visible to all. By all I mean, the learner, the teacher, the whānau and society.

    Secondly, the learning is more authentic. This is due to the fact that the blog is out there for the world to see, to interact with and therefore the learning is augmented.

    Thirdly, blogging allows for timely feedback to occur. Feedback from teachers, peers, whānau and other nodes on the network (Castells, 2000b). I have been giving feedback to my learners today in our integrated English and PE module. Feedback/feed- forward, where I hope I am making the learning more visible. Where I add value, challenge thinking and help shift the learners on their level of thinking.

    In addition, I believe that a blog is a great way to document and catch the learning journey in a better way than many other modes. I believe that it allows for a way to capture formative data about learning without the high stakes of a final summative assessment. I therefore believe it allows for the true alignment of curriculum, assessment and pedagogy and disables the potential for assessment to be the main driver.

    In integrated learning, it is enabling a natural connection between PE and English. The learning is occurring, in, through and about movement (Arnold, 1979). There is a holistic focus between the doing and the learning. We are looking at socio-critical aspects such as gender, socio-economics and more and the influence of these on participation and competence in sport and physical activity. We are taking the critical aspects of this even further. We are using this content and using a blog as tool to capture this learning and understanding. The mode of the blog is being used as a tool to develop the learners writing ability for English. A hook in for those who love either PE or English or both. A hook into another learning area where it may not occur and a great way to connect their learning

    To support the blog and make the learning even more visible, we have rubrics developed at school, that allow us to give specific feedback and feed-forward on where learners are at and where to next. The module is “Do we get what we are given?”, we are exploring nature vs nurture. We have a SOLO rubric for each level of PE and here is an example for level 5. We use the AO’s from the NZC to drive this and SOLO to show the level of thinking.

    We are practicing what we are preaching and both Ros and Ihttps://plus.google.com/+RosMacEachern/posts are bloggers of what we are up to. We are also using a class blog as a platform for our teaching and learning programme, ensuring learners can access this at any time/just in time…
    here is a link to our blog http://getgiven.blogspot.co.nz/

    If you are reading this you may like to check out some of our learners blogs, so that they can get your voice as well, this will help us to make the learning even more authentic.

    Finally, another great reason to blog, for us and our learners is sharing, sharing the range of different contexts, teaching and learning programmes, and ways of doing things that are out there, to keep being creative with the spaces between curriculum, assessment and pedagogy and not being stuck in doing things the way we have always done them. At the end of this we are looking for our learners to transform beliefs and societal understandings for others and what better way to do this than by sharing their journey with others and asking for them to be a part of it…

    Arnold, P. (1979). Meaning in movement, sport and physical education. London: Heinemann.
    Castells, M. (2000b). The rise of the network society (2nd ed.). U.S.: Blackwell Publishing.

  • Suzanne Lee (View all users posts) 01 Nov 2015 1:19pm ()

    Hi Sally as always I really enjoy your posts they are informative, practical and thought provoking. This is clearly an area where you have a great deal more experience than myself!

    The inquiry model is embedded into our school practice and has been used effectively in the most part around the focus of priority learners through our staff appraisal system this year. At the start of this year opened up BYOD to all students and started a e-Learning committee (lead by Tony for his NAPP Inquiry) who have worked progressively through the process of infrastructure, systems, questionnaires (Parents/students/staff) to identify needs. The aim is to start two classes e-Learning classes next year, one in Year 7 & 9 which students and Teachers will opt into. I have not really been involved in this. However; I can see the real benefits of organising a whole school inquiry focus on e-Learning.

    I like you focus on Blogging and can really see the benefits for your students within your school. I think that one of the benefits of starting with a new school is that you can employ staff with the skill set to develop a curriculum and Teaching and Learning programme around the effective use of technology. Like other schools the problems really start with the diverse range of staff within the school to use and deliver effective teaching and positive learning experiences through e-Learning.

    I also like your question "Why use blogging?" and I guess this could be extended to any online medium? and I guess that's the backbone of the use of any technology/software in the classroom. Why are we using it? How are we using it? How effective a learning tool is it? Can I measure the impact that it has on student learning/achievement?

    The challenge that you set in your summing up "to keep being creative with the spaces between curriculum, assessment and pedagogy and not being stuck in doing things the way we have always done them" resonates with me on a personal level. Working with a Head of PE that leads the way with effective use of technology has really pushed me to improve my 'skill set' and changed the way that I teach and assess student progress. I really enjoy the 24 hour accessibility to my classes through google classroom and the ease at which I can receive feedback from students. I know that I have become a more effective teacher... Our challenge now is how can we effectively finish the journey of e-Learning that we have started.

  • Jim Peters (View all users posts) 02 Nov 2015 8:12am ()

    Kia ora Suzanne. I read your post with interest, especially the comments addressed to Sally. I admire your commitment to open-mindedness.  If schooling is going to forge ahead and meet future needs, open-mindedness is critical. My worry is that it is not as endemic as we might want it to be, including among our leaders.  Schools  tend to be conservative institutions, don't you think?  How much of a problem is resistance to change among leaders - and how can it be dealt with?

  • Keir Morrison (View all users posts) 08 Nov 2015 11:25am ()

    Hi Sally

    Loving your love of the blog.

    We started using blogger in our Media and Film Studies classes about a decade ago in the UK. It was the best thing we ever did in the department -- alongside creating an Oscars style red carpet event to showcase the kids stunning work (it was THE student event of the year, dahling).

    We had teacher led blogs and student led blogs - the student ones were based around their group production work so all chipped in - the ability to upload all their planning/story boards etc through to first edits and final submission of their video work and the evaluations/reflections on it -- it was pretty ground-breaking -- and utterly brilliant for collaborative learning and feedback / feed forward -  one of the best things was the students themselves providing feedback on each others' work and it quickly ramped up the quality of the production work through kids being inspired by their peers -- and like you say, a total dream for the teachers/learners in terms of having clear progression of learning and understanding through the unit/year. We chose blogger for the 'authenticity' aspect you mention. It seemed "real world" to them, rather than doing it through a school based VLN. 

    So makes me want to go teach Media again!

  • Lyn Jones NAPP 2015 (View all users posts) 01 Nov 2015 2:34pm ()

    I have been reading these posts with interest and I am impressed with the range of thought and research that has been expounded in them.

    I congratulate the posters.... after many years of using digital tools and devices, online learning and blogs to raise student achievement I believe it does to some extent. The extent that it raises achievement appears to linked very closely to how it is used and monitored by the teacher. The competency of the teacher using the device is also relevant to the success of the student achievement.

    I have had experience using all sorts of devices and tools over a wide range of learners, including remedial and extension students but there appears to be limitations to all learners in the following areas:

    • Learners need to be explicitly taught to use each application or tool. This may be limiting because of their ability to read and spell or the time it takes to teach each child (unless the school has a class set of the preferred device). The cost of supplying these in rural schools or low decile schools can be a barrier- constraints of resourcing need to be considered.
    • Learners need to be able to understand and interpret the symbols on task bars ( barrier to ESOL Learners or remedial learners)
    • Learners need to be able to process information at speed- this limits our slow processing students and is a barrier to assessing them online as it doesn't necessarily show what they know. It is more demonstrative of how quickly the read and process information.
    • Accessibility to speed on a braodband line can alter all over NZ despite the high speed broad band cable.... if the local telephone exchange can't handle faxibility the internet connection speed will crash with 30 children online at the same time ( a very rural problem). This also affects children and famiies ability to connect on a blog or mobile device.
    • Families struggling to make ends met in NZ are electing not to pay for broadband.

    The most successful interventions using devices for me was with low progress readers, struggling students in numeracy and a downs syndrome student. With no verbal communication and no way of assessing the downs syndrome students' understanding we found apps to teach and  assess his numeracy and, develop handwriting, fine motor skills and assist with communication. All at Year 0.

    With attendance the biggest determiner of success at school, we still have children who are not in our classrooms...so why not expect the virtual classroom to be attended.

    There is no reason with the tools and devices we have available that children absent from our classrooms cannot engage in literacy and numeracy learning. Keeping up to date with the classroom is only a matter of Skyping, collaborating with lessons online and completing online tasks but  this is still not expected. imagine the rise in student achievement if we could facilitate this to happen.

    The question of MLE and ILE's and collaborative teaching has in the past proved successful as 'open plan' classrooms and team teaching.  However there were limitations to the success around managing students (particularly noise levels) and what to do with our highly distracted students. The question of teaching relationships also was of interest.  I take heed of Andrea's comments and support those entirely!

    I would add:

    The crucial determiner of raising student achievement is the relationship between the teacher and the student and the emotional environment of the classroom or school. If a child is respected, feels safe and is free from fear and their needs are supported they will thrive.

    Our school is to trial a collaborative teaching space within the Year 0-1 area of the school. As the team leader receiving these children in 2017 into my team I will see what this trial produces. I look forward to seeing what emerges.

    I experienced team teaching as rewarding and affirming experience so I look forward to moving to a collaborative teaching scenario but personally I will want some input to whom I teach with. I have known and heard from some very unhappy teachers  for whom collaborative teaching doesn't work!

     

     

     

  • Steve (View all users posts) 01 Nov 2015 3:19pm ()

    Kia Ora Lynne

    Using technology enhances engagement with learning but cannot be a measure for improved outcomes. This is an interesting statement? I would say in the larger picture engagement is only 20% of the equation which equates to 80% of unmeasurable outcomes in this scenerio? 

    What steps are required for the transformation of student learning to occur and the transformation of teacher practice? If you were able to measure outcomes according to SAMR for both teacher and student what would you expect to see? What discussions would be needed to create the change? If the SAMR data suggests teachers and students are constantly falling short is this not a measurable outcome? 

    http://wiki.lib.sun.ac.za/images/thumb/5/51/SAMR.jpg/600px-SAMR.jpg

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e-Learning: Leadership

e-Learning: Leadership

Exploring leadership for change, vision, policy and strategy that integrates ICTs into learning.