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Resourcing how and why of e-Learning | NAPP Kōrero 6 2015

Kia ora koutou, talofa lava and welcome to this kōrero 6, 2015 on, Resourcing and e-Learning.

 

Just to set the scene, it is important to have a common understanding of what e-learning is as well as the purpose and potential of e-learning before school leaders commit to resourcing decisions.

 

E-Learning is defined by Enabling e-Learning as, “learning and teaching that is facilitated by or supported through the appropriate use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Whatever the technology, however, learning is the vital element. e-Learning is not simply associated with modes of delivery or the functionality of a particular technology, but forms part of a conscious choice of the best and most appropriate ways of promoting effective learning.

If, best practice e-learning enables accessible, relevant, and high-quality learning opportunities that improve student engagement and achievement”, how might resourcing decisions define processes required to ensure e-learning capacities get the best chance to grow – e.g: establishing priorities across all school resourcing, confirming a process for teacher capacities to grow, confirming processes for inclusion of student voice and community voice and involvement?

 

Smart tools like the e-Learning Planning Framework (available online) can help schools to support self review about how well ICTs and e-learning are currently being used to support learning, as well as next steps to work towards desired goals so that technologies can be used, “....effectively across the curriculum to connect schools and communities and to provide accessible, relevant, and high-quality learning opportunities so that every student is better able to achieve their full potential.”

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Image taken from LIVE webinar | Using the e-Learning Planning Framework online tool and analysing your data, 25 March, 2015, Greg Carroll

 

The key questions for us are:

  • Why do New Zealand Schools need to resource “widely and wisely in growing e-learning capacities”?

  • How do principals lead “resourcing widely and wisely in growing e-learning capacities”?

 

This kōrero is supported by, WEBINAR: Resourcing e-Learning | NAPP Kōrero 6, Wednesday 10 June, 3.45- 4.45pm. Join us as we discuss the implications of effective e-learning with NAPP participants and invited guests (e-Learning Planning Framework, Connected Learning Advisory). Hosted in Adobe Connect with Tessa GrayREGISTER NOW!


 

Some resources to kick start this kōrero…

Replies

  • Campbell Maunder (View all users posts) 09 Jun 2015 2:47pm ()

    Kia Ora everyone, 

     

    I have enjoyed sharing in the e-learning leadership journeys that we are all on. It is an area where taking your time, establishing the vision and thinking behind 'the gear' and ensuring teacher understanding is all hugely important. My work in recent years has been getting many of the 'nuts and bolts' in place for our school to enable the exciting stuff to happen for teachers and learners. 

     

    Below is some of the work I have recently taken my team through in relation to us as a school entering our next phase of e-learning. 

     

     

    e-Learning Thinking, Pedagogy and Planning

     

    Getting the (learning) horse

    in front of the (I.T) cart…

     

    • Why bother?

     

    • Is it good marketing? Yes, probably - but blimmin expensive and somewhat empty unless it’s followed up by great teaching and improved outcomes for students!

     

    • Here is a great quote outlining Innovation specialist Grant Lichtman’s views on innovation and I.T  

      • “I am more interested in how effective archers are at choosing the right arrows and right targets than I am in the shape of their bows.”

        • The Arrows: questions, problems, inquiry, passion, creativity and introspection

        • The Target: learning outcomes

        • The Bows: Digital (and other) devices

     

    • You may notice a shift in focus here I.T knowledge is not the ultimate target, rather a tool to enable greater levels of personalisation and innovation which we believe will lead to higher outcomes for kids!

      • We acknowledge that teachers and students will have to learn some actual ‘I.T’ skills along the way for this deeper learning to happen

     

    What the research tells us about well-managed e-Learning: From our School Policy on e-Learning

    • Enabling e-learning is defining ‘e-learning’ as learning and teaching that is facilitated by or supported through the appropriate use of information and communication technologies (ICTs).

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    • e-learning can cover a spectrum of activities from supporting learning to blended learning (the combination of traditional and e-learning practices), to learning that is delivered entirely online.

    •  

    • Whatever the technology, however, learning is the vital element. E-learning is not simply associated with modes of delivery or the functionality of a particular technology, but forms part of a conscious choice of the best and most appropriate ways of promoting effective learning.

    •  

    • Best practice e-learning enables accessible, relevant, and high-quality learning opportunities that improve student engagement and achievement. E-learning has the potential to transform the way teaching and learning takes place. It is about using technologies effectively across the curriculum to connect schools and communities and to provide accessible, relevant, and high-quality learning opportunities so that every learner is better able to achieve their full potential.

     

    • Connecting the dots:

      • Recapping on our vision at our school and our Strategic Aims

      • What have we learnt from Accelerating Learning in Literacy (ALL)?

      • What can we tie in from Joseph Driessen’s work with us?

    Our Vision:

     

    Enriched and successful learners who achieve excellence and contribute positively to society.

     

    MIS Charter: How the Strategic Aims are driving our move towards Future Focused Learning and this most-recent investment

     

    Strategic Aim 1:

    To know our MIS students in order to achieve ongoing improvements towards and beyond National Standards (Reading, Writing and Mathematics) in readiness for College.

    • How do we think this shift into higher use of digital devices and digital spaces might assist here?

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    Strategic Aim 2:

    To ensure that the Maori Culture is alive and well at MIS.

    • SAFP ‘what’s best for Maori is best for all’ (Bishop et al)

      • Ka Hikitia

      • Ka Hikitia (Ministry of Education, 2007) emphasises that “culture

    counts” and describes a commitment to “knowing, respecting and

    valuing where students are, where they come from and building on

    what they bring with them” (page 20).

    • Could personalising learning and using digital tools allow students to experience success ‘where [they] are, where they come from and building on what they bring with them’?

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    Strategic Aim 3:

    To promote the unique character of MIS.

    • MIS is known as a school that sets students up for the future with a broad range of valuable experiences. Along this theme, we are providing our students experience and capability in multiple operating systems (Mac, Windows, Google OS). This is not a ‘clunky weakness’, but a strategic strength.

     
    • In what ways might ‘the unique character of MIS’ be promoted through smart teaching and the use of these tools?

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    PB4L

    • What Behaviour for Learning will we need to ensure our learners are skilled at with further use of digital tools?

      • What behaviours and routines will we need to teach and establish to allow these tools to work in our classes?

        • Storage

        • Charging

        • Care

        • Security

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      • What does ADMIRE look like in a digital space?

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    • We will be linking back to PB4L - particularly as we learn about ‘Digital Citizenship’

     

    Literacy PLD (Including ALL)

    • Amanda’s summary of her successful ALL intervention touched on the importance of rich experiences, relevance, choice, ownership, audience and student voice. These things are true of all learning. This list of factors for success was very similar from school to school through the ALL feedback.

      • How might these things be aided and enhanced through the increased availability and use of digital devices?

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    Landing the plane at Wellington:

    • Joseph Driessen used an analogy likening successful learning to being like successfully landing a plane at Wellington airport.

      • How might the availability and smart use of these tools help us to successfully plan and navigate against the ‘crosswinds’ of challenging students?

        • Could planned use of specific digital resources allow for greater personalisation of learning?

        • Could they be a ‘hand grenade’ - changing the pace when the energy levels are lagging?

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    How do we think using digital devices and digital spaces can ‘change the game’ for us and for kids?

    • Creative capabilities at our fingertips

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    • Info at our fingertips

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    • High engagement, relevance and ownership for kids

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    • Genuine audience for sharing learning  

      • Facebook

      • Google Docs

        • Teacher

        • Each other!

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    • Meaningful collaboration

      • It is good at democratizing the creation and management of knowledge, which can be controlled by either the teacher or by the student.

      • Videoconference facilities, listening to a teacher in some other part of the world, politely raising their hands and responding to the questions she posed.

      • Students stood and recited the parts of the human heart as they rotated images on their iPads at the direction of the teacher.

      • At Franklin Community School in Indianapolis, Indiana, students in Don Wettrick’s revolutionary Innovations class are designing, refining and prototyping projects of their own creation through social media outreach.

      • At Mount Vernon Presbyterian in Atlanta, Georgia, a ninth grade class is working with the teacher to write and publish its own history book.

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    From Grant Lichtman again:

     

    Our job is not to help the students pull the bow, they are already better at that than most of us. Our job is to help them learn which bows and arrows to use, help them strengthen their arms, and know when to use their arrows and for what purpose.

     

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e-Learning: Leadership

e-Learning: Leadership

Exploring leadership for change, vision, policy and strategy that integrates ICTs into learning.