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Resourcing how and why of e-Learning | NAPP Kōrero 6 2015

Kia ora koutou, talofa lava and welcome to this kōrero 6, 2015 on, Resourcing and e-Learning.

 

Just to set the scene, it is important to have a common understanding of what e-learning is as well as the purpose and potential of e-learning before school leaders commit to resourcing decisions.

 

E-Learning is defined by Enabling e-Learning as, “learning and teaching that is facilitated by or supported through the appropriate use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). Whatever the technology, however, learning is the vital element. e-Learning is not simply associated with modes of delivery or the functionality of a particular technology, but forms part of a conscious choice of the best and most appropriate ways of promoting effective learning.

If, best practice e-learning enables accessible, relevant, and high-quality learning opportunities that improve student engagement and achievement”, how might resourcing decisions define processes required to ensure e-learning capacities get the best chance to grow – e.g: establishing priorities across all school resourcing, confirming a process for teacher capacities to grow, confirming processes for inclusion of student voice and community voice and involvement?

 

Smart tools like the e-Learning Planning Framework (available online) can help schools to support self review about how well ICTs and e-learning are currently being used to support learning, as well as next steps to work towards desired goals so that technologies can be used, “....effectively across the curriculum to connect schools and communities and to provide accessible, relevant, and high-quality learning opportunities so that every student is better able to achieve their full potential.”

image

Image taken from LIVE webinar | Using the e-Learning Planning Framework online tool and analysing your data, 25 March, 2015, Greg Carroll

 

The key questions for us are:

  • Why do New Zealand Schools need to resource “widely and wisely in growing e-learning capacities”?

  • How do principals lead “resourcing widely and wisely in growing e-learning capacities”?

 

This kōrero is supported by, WEBINAR: Resourcing e-Learning | NAPP Kōrero 6, Wednesday 10 June, 3.45- 4.45pm. Join us as we discuss the implications of effective e-learning with NAPP participants and invited guests (e-Learning Planning Framework, Connected Learning Advisory). Hosted in Adobe Connect with Tessa GrayREGISTER NOW!


 

Some resources to kick start this kōrero…

Replies

  • Katie Macfarlane (View all users posts) 23 Aug 2015 8:08pm ()

    This has been such an interesting thread to read with so many great ideas about how e-learning can be successfully led and developed within a school. It seems that discussion, effective trials, consultation, collaboration and clear strategic vision are the common characteristics in the most successful schools. Principals really do have to lead the embracing of new developments and ensure that access is provided to quality support and PD to ensure no-one (staff, students, and community) is left behind. There are really exciting times ahead with the possibilities that will arise from the introduction of digital assessment for NCEA and there are some good aspects for guiding discussion on the NZQA website. http://www.nzqa.govt.nz/about-us/innovation-at-nzqa/our-strategic-thinking/digital-assessment/


    The BYOD concept is now pretty well established in many schools so I would be interested to know how many schools have looked into students’ use of devices during break times as a part of e-learning strategic vision and planning? We recently had an article published in a student newspaper in which senior students expressed their dismay at the number of junior students on their devices outside of class time (we have been a BYOD for two years). They lamented their lack of ‘play’. It seems to me that while the most important focus of the progression of technological capacity in schools is teaching and learning, there are wider social and community aspects that need to be considered in the development of e-Learning environments.

  • Carl Condliffe (View all users posts) 30 Aug 2015 8:51pm ()

    Fantastic contribution Claire. I would like to respond that I really believe we should have our staff and teachers strengthen the "foundations". We can have all the infrastructure in the world, but without having some prior knowledge, training or sound experience, we are tasking our staff with a job they can be significantly under prepared for. Yes we can and should help them evolve, but I think at the inception of an e-Learning initiative SLT and principals should be more direct with their approach to training.

    I have been in two schools rolling out e-Learning plans in conjunction with starting BYOD. One had a significant training period (almost a year) where staff spent at least an hour a week getting their heads around the framework, research, pedagogical alignment as well as basics of using technology. The second school was not so robust with their foundation work and I feel are paying the price for that now.

     

  • Keir Morrison (View all users posts) 31 Aug 2015 10:57am ()

    What a stunning string of posts - so much detail covered already but I'd like to pick up on the digital devices outside the classroom comments. Concerns are often expressed about students spending "too much time" on their devices in the playground during break and lunch. 

    We also need to be careful that time on devices doesn't become the new "TV" (too much TV gives you square eyes etc etc) - when do we ever chastise kids for reading too much or playing too much rugby? Don't get me wrong, there is plenty to suggest that too much screen time can have negative side effects. Sleep patterns is an obvious example:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/too-much-exposure-to-smartphone-screens-ruins-your-sleep-study-shows-10019185.html

    However, a well constructed "digital citizenship" element to any e-learning strategy should cover this sort of thing. Balance is usually the key. Teaching balance with kids from an early age is crucial (and having some decent reasons for it helps).

    Do some schools need help with this though? Netsafe have some really useful tools for schools but how widely are they used?

    http://www.netsafe.org.nz/Doc_Library/Digital_Citizenship_in_New_Zealand_Schools_Overview.pdf

    http://www.netsafe.org.nz/growing-digital-citizens/

    Where does digital citizenship fit into the secondary curriculum though? Teaching in a secondary context it seems like Health and Social Studies would be obvious fits but with the increasing demands of "getting through the curriculum", some teachers (who feel under prepared to deal with some of this stuff anyway) don't want to know. 

    How many secondary schools "do" digital citizenship as a "bolt-on" getting the likes of attitude speakers to come in and deliver this to students, rather than tackle it themselves?

    We've recently been approached by a documentary producer interested in speaking to some of our senior students about pervasiveness of HSIP (high speed internet pornography) and teenage exposure to it - this is a classic example of a complex issue that needs discussion and debate not only at school but in homes and the wider community as well. How well are we educating our young people about these sorts of things? 

  • Ange Pau'u (View all users posts) 06 Sep 2015 11:27pm ()

    Talofa everyone

    Very interesting reads, lots to take in, especially coming from a school who is new to e-learning.  Well actually we are not that new to the concept of e-learning, but it is new in our learning and professional development.

    We have a leader who oversees our IT unit, but this is new learning for her.  So we are moving forward but very very slowly.  No point rushing into it, because as some of you have already discovered and shared, e-learning isn't something that you can just start doing and everything will fall into place.

    We are continually having PD as well as PLG for using digital tools within the classroom.  We have ipads (3), laptops (4) and if lucky a computer (1) in our classrooms, we are still waiting on chrome books for staff and students to at least have a go on before making the decision that is the digital tool we would use.

    Our action plan is in place but not yet fully developed, so we are still in the process of doing this.  The outline plan Claire shared in the beginning will be a great help and visual tool for us to use when making decisions and choices on why go e-learning.

  • Denise Johnson (View all users posts) 09 Sep 2015 7:20am ()

    Having had the experience of BYOD being adopted without a school wide vision being developed in collaboration with both staff and students, I have experienced the pitfalls of not seeing the importance of the vision being in place first. As you commented Geoff we need  work together in order to build understanding and capability with  pedagogy at the centre. For that reason the diagram Claire that you posted is a helpful and succinct tool to support teachers on the focusing  on our pedagogy that leads learning in the 21st century. Likewise Anna B’s post about TPACK, her links and questions and particularly her statement of  “When there is strategic direction for e-learning, I think transformational learning can occur for students “ is so true and has been of great benefit for me as I have begun leading the development of our school vision for e-learning.

    We have gone back to the drawing board and one of the discussions we have had to kick start discussion is to consider whether we are a digital native or a digital immigrant? It has been an interesting question to reflect on as issues of launching the classroom blogs have been discussed and debated, and whether we are native or an immigrant certainly colours the discussion.

    Marc Prensky, the American writer and speaker on learning and education; who popularised the above terms, challenges us to consider how do we engage with our children/ students in the 21st century? As he says “Digital Immigrants  look at technology as a tool, we say “we have an interactive whiteboard, we have this and that tool.” Digital Natives look at technology as a foundation, it underlies everything they do and it is integrated into everything they do – communicating, sharing, buying, selling, learning, gaming – We all do these things but Digital Natives have invented ways in which to do this online - they communicate through instant messaging and chat; they share through blogs and myspace; they buy and sell through Trade Me;  they learn from wikipedia ; they game online. In summary they have an online life as they want to be connected - they want community. So yes Claire I definitely agree - start with the students first!

     
  • Denise Johnson (View all users posts) 09 Sep 2015 7:20am ()

    Having had the experience of BYOD being adopted without a school wide vision being developed in collaboration with both staff and students, I have experienced the pitfalls of not seeing the importance of the vision being in place first. As you commented Geoff we need  work together in order to build understanding and capability with  pedagogy at the centre. For that reason the diagram Claire that you posted is a helpful and succinct tool to support teachers on the focusing  on our pedagogy that leads learning in the 21st century. Likewise Anna B’s post about TPACK, her links and questions and particularly her statement of  “When there is strategic direction for e-learning, I think transformational learning can occur for students “ is so true and has been of great benefit for me as I have begun leading the development of our school vision for e-learning.

    We have gone back to the drawing board and one of the discussions we have had to kick start discussion is to consider whether we are a digital native or a digital immigrant? It has been an interesting question to reflect on as issues of launching the classroom blogs have been discussed and debated, and whether we are native or an immigrant certainly colours the discussion.

    Marc Prensky, the American writer and speaker on learning and education; who popularised the above terms, challenges us to consider how do we engage with our children/ students in the 21st century? As he says “Digital Immigrants  look at technology as a tool, we say “we have an interactive whiteboard, we have this and that tool.” Digital Natives look at technology as a foundation, it underlies everything they do and it is integrated into everything they do – communicating, sharing, buying, selling, learning, gaming – We all do these things but Digital Natives have invented ways in which to do this online - they communicate through instant messaging and chat; they share through blogs and myspace; they buy and sell through Trade Me;  they learn from wikipedia ; they game online. In summary they have an online life as they want to be connected - they want community. So yes Claire I definitely agree - start with the students first!

     
  • Delaney Yaqona (View all users posts) 09 Sep 2015 8:22am ()

    Thanks for this Claire.  Since last year I have been working with the MOE to upgrade our IT capability.  It was clear that we did not have the necessary resources to meet our students needs.  Once that was put in place I worked through establishing how much internet access we could provide for our school with the funds that was available.  This proved to be difficult but I believe that the school has a plan that meets the students and teachers needs and is within our budget.  Next stage to build on staff capability through PLD that I am in the process of organising with advisors from the MOE.  In the meantime, we have used our own 'expertise' (teachers with knowledge of current IT pedagogy) in providing 'small staff PD' sessions.  This has been helpful in opening up teachers to new ideas to enhance student engagement using technology that they are growing more and more familiar with.

    It has been an exciting process but at the same time a little 'scary' for some teachers.  However, it is important that we alleviate these fears as a lot of it stems from the 'unknown'.  This will be a major focus as we continue this journey of developing e-learning capabilities within our school.

     

  • Lyn Jones NAPP 2015 (View all users posts) 20 Sep 2015 1:05pm ()

    Thank you Andrea : At the Hui I too, was motivated and challenged by Jane Glibert’s presentation.  When schools are looking at resourcing “ widely and wisely in growing e-learning capacities,”  some of Jane’s ideas around the increasingly fast changing world may help guide schools decisions about spending/resourcing.

    We need to be building capacity for learners to be problem solvers - there may not be ‘jobs’ for all people in the future - what skills, capacity, knowledge do learners need?

    She talked about “jobs we can’t imagine today - few people in paid work and the ‘robotification’ of current jobs education for non work” (Gilbert NAPP Hui 2015)  we are facing a future filled with uncertainty, unpredictability and complexity.  

    What will happen to our priority learners in this future?

    Therefore,  investing in digital tools, PLD for teachers and a clear plan for ongoing resourcing will support our learners in gaining the experience, skills and knowledge that they need for the future. But how far will this take us and at what cost?

    We need to be future focused and as best we can future proofing, so that our financial investment lasts more than 12 months.

    I cringed at my last BOT meeting at my previous school as the BOT voted to invest $10,000 in new computers rather than lease them, after much education from my then Principal and myself about how quickly technology changes and the need to future proof ourselves and the investment of the schools money.

    Old habits from conservative rural NZ !

    As school leaders education needs to start with our communities that support us first, it may be of interest that some of our more rural settings are still awaiting telephone exchanges that support faxes let alone fibre optic broadband even though it is at our gate!

    There are  still plenty of challenges that face teaching and e-learning in some settings but the world will not wait for us.... urgency is required to engage in this valuable mode of learning for our rural children in particular!

     

  • Fastpaddy (View all users posts) 20 Sep 2015 2:04pm ()

    Was this webinar recorded? If so, please will you send out a link.

     

    Thanks

  • Tessa Gray (View all users posts) 21 Sep 2015 10:45pm ()

    Hi Fastpaddy, we've got several recordings of the Napp and EEL webinars. You can find them here @ /groupcms/view/187012/webinar-recordings smiley

  • Mary Kaye (View all users posts) 30 Sep 2015 1:45pm ()

    It is important that the principal is part of the leadership team when implementing IT PD with staff, even if it is as a supporting role.

    Using the eLP Framework to establish what the needs are gives a great starting point. I also think it is important to focus on the pedagogy of using a device in the classroom programmes not the type of technology you are using.

    PD needs to focus on building capabilities around planning, teaching & learning with IT not implementing new apps or great presentation skills.

    These tools should be used to build collaboration, and develop the key competencies with students.

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e-Learning: Leadership

e-Learning: Leadership

Exploring leadership for change, vision, policy and strategy that integrates ICTs into learning.