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Connecting Kids and Communities to Science

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Started by Jessica Costa 08 Sep 2014 4:05pm () Replies (11)

Hello & welcome to the CENZ14 Science Learning and Change Networks discussion!

 

This discussion invites you to reflect on the ways, people and places that children choose to involve in learning science. This will be important for schools trying to set up learning & change networks to improve science education. This forum is part of the Connected Educator Month calendar of events, so we hope to have regional, community and international perspectives, as well as a longer format than the discussions on Twitter currently allow for.

 

Some resources to refer to during this conversation:

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Our key questions to be discussed in this thread:

  • Do the ways our students choose to learn science match our expectations? How can we determine who are priority learners for science?
  • How can our science teaching more strongly root the children's learning into investigations that link to our communities AND ignite their passions?
  • How can teachers and administrators facilitate engagement between children and the scientific community?

 

We'll have this thread open throughout #CENZ14 so be sure to check back often and contribute as much as you like. Remember to tweet about your posts using #SciLCNNZ!

 

Replies

  • Jessica Costa (View all users posts) 08 Oct 2014 4:19pm ()

    “Short-duration science outreach”

     

    One method of community connection between schools and science is bringing scientists into classrooms to supplement or temporarily replace teachers. There are examples of these initiatives that are:

     

    -       government-led, like “Scientists and Mathematicians in Schools” from Australia’s Department of Education;

    -       scientist-led, like Harvard & MIT’s “There’s a Scientist in my classroom!”;

    -       led by teachers requesting specialists for specific curriculum, as for National Lab Day.

     

    We could compare and contrast these existing programmes here in this forum, and perhaps look at peer-reviewed research that assesses these types of interactions. Or have you found examples you’d like to discuss?

     

    Is this a worthwhile endeavour for Science LCNs, or do we need to develop our own programme in NZ? Thoughts?

  • Jessica Costa (View all users posts) 09 Oct 2014 3:22pm ()

    “Citizen Science”

     

    There's an amazing variety of citizen science projects where anyone of any age or ability can contribute to scientific data collection, usually with a digital device. The studies are often part of real-world scientific research, so subjects range from NZ animal species to astrophysics! Maybe you took part in the recent Kereru count of birds in your local neighbourhood using their app or website. Or maybe you contributed to a global project, like solving molecular puzzles for Fold It, or classifying images from the Hubble Space Telescope in Galaxy Zoo. Many of these projects have developed complementary resources and tools to help support teachers and students, and make it easier to integrate contributing to a citizen science project into learning plans.

     

    Have you considered contributing to a citizen science project from the classroom? What is your favourite citizen science project that you’ve come across? Have your students talked to you or their peers about #CitizenSci?

  • Jessica Costa (View all users posts) 15 Oct 2014 4:27pm ()

    “Can kids be scientists?”

     

    In a TED talk, neuroscientist Beau Lotto asks this and found that “scientists said small children couldn’t make useful contributions to science. And teachers said kids couldn’t do it.”

     

    But we have numerous examples of students’ inherent curiosity and capability in science and technology. From cancer research, to slime mould studies, to newly patented inventions and student involvement in the Maker Movement, and beyond, we have a variety of successful examples to draw on.

     

    What is different about the opportunities these students had, and how can we (or should we?) make them available to our students? What are the possible roles for Science Learning & Change Networks in answering this question?

     

    As Amy, one of the students from the Blackawtown Bees study, says: “Science isn’t just a boring subject… anyone can discover something new: you just need the opportunity.”

  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 20 Oct 2014 7:30pm ()
    • Our key questions answered by tony cairns:

      • Do the ways our students choose to learn science match our expectations?

      Yes they do match my expectations as I have taught primary, intermediate secondary tertiary and preschool classes for a dozen years or more.

      • How can we determine who are priority learners for science?

      If they can hold a conversation, have a pulse and are breathing we can teach them – in fact those with issues with any of the above are our first priority learners, then young students starting with preschool then primary, secondary and tertiary in that order imho

      Disadvantages, poor, discriminated against, unknowing, unaware students could be the next priority. If students wish to learn whatever the age i=or stage they have a right to be taught using all the resources and experience we can find.

      • How can our science teaching more strongly root the children's learning into investigations that link to our communities AND ignite their passions?

      Ask them what they want to learn – then help them to learn it. Ask the parents, caregivers and whanau. Ask what they are passionate about - share what we find fun and worthwhile.

      • How can teachers and administrators facilitate engagement between children and the scientific community?

      Treat all kids, whanau and communities as scientists, teach the methods and evaluate the responses. Clip and share the papers, magazines, journals and books with kids. Share TV DVD, blogs, social media, pinterest, picassa, gooogle+ google classroom and youtube clips in a safe and group of teacher’s way.

      “Short-duration science outreach”

    •  Since i am a primary trained teacher i can take experiments, resources, equipment, Staff and ideas from Secondary to primary schools to help Primary teachers plan, carry out and evaluate learning experiences. I suggest all schools buddy up and move kids through each other’s schools, labs and classrooms to create vertical and horizontal groups within and between schools. The mixing of students in small groups Tuakana teina and mentoring programmes and G&T and Extension work would assist both levels. We do this at High with local primary schools.

       

  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 20 Oct 2014 7:46pm ()
    • e method of community connection between schools and science is bringing scientists into classrooms to supplement or temporarily replace teachers. There are examples of these initiatives that are:

     

    -       government-led, like “Scientists and Mathematicians in Schools” from Australia’s Department of Education;

    -       scientist-led, like Harvard & MIT’s “There’s a Scientist in my classroom!”;

    -       led by teachers requesting specialists for specific curriculum, as for National Lab Day.

     

    We could compare and contrast these existing programmes here in this forum, and perhaps look at peer-reviewed research that assesses these types of interactions. Or have you found examples you’d like to discuss?

    Scientists in the classroom and Science classes in labs and fields

    Access the kids parents, relatives and family friends to bring the “scientists” into the school. Visit, labs, streams, forests, plays, public science events, science movies, universities, science plays, observatories, archives, galleries, museums, offshore islands, gardens, zoos etc

    • Susan Weeks and the IPENZ will assist
    • Te Papa and National Services will assist
    • Thom Adam Wellington Zoo is awesome
    • Hari M from carter Observatory is great
    • Diane Ormsby VUW id=s great on bioethics
    • Malahghan institute is amazing
    • Subject organizations like BEANZ and SciCon
    • Most NIWA, DOC, ESR, MOBI scientists will help given notice and a polite request
    • Jacquie Bay is amazing see contact details below

    MEd(Hons), BSc, DipTch

    Director LENS | Liggins Institute

    Doctoral Candidate - Health Sciences | Population Health

    +64 (0) 9 923 4282

    j.bay@auckland.ac.nz

    Media Contact

    www.liggins.auckland.ac.nz

    www.lenscience.auckland.ac.nz

    www.nrcgd.

    Is this a worthwhile endeavour for Science LCNs, or do we need to develop our own programme in NZ? Thoughts?

    We have heaps of NZ based resources already so lets better communicate and use those first

    “Citizen Science”

    This is a great start to a life of fun, knowledge an scinece

    “Can kids be scientists?”

    Yes of course all kids are born scientists they just need the skills, expertise and mentoring to shine. Science is evidence based inquiry with rigorous testing of the perceived facts against preconceived theories by experimentation and ongoing observation . all kids peoples and a groups can and are doing it for themselves


  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 20 Oct 2014 7:53pm ()
    Nore images of Astronomy outreach for Observatories
     
  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 20 Oct 2014 7:56pm ()

    image

    SAGANet.org is recruiting Science Mentors for our Fall 2014 Mentoring Programs!

     

    SAGANet.org is looking for early-career scientists (grads, postdocs, starting faculty) interested in mentoring opportunities to engage the public in the excitement of science! As a SAGANet.org mentor you will have the opportunity to connect with teachers, K12 students and even families using virtual and social media.

     

    Benefits of Becoming a SAGANet.org Mentor:

    • Low time commitment: ~5-10 hours total for the fall semester.

    • High impact way to engage in STEM outreach from the comfort of your own desk! No commute necessary!

    • Expert training in science communication skills and mentoring best practices.

    • A peer-support group of like-minded early career scientists interested in engaging the public in the wonder of science!

     

    Participating mentors will receive expert training in science communication and earn a certificate of recognition upon completion of their mentoring experience!

     

    Fall 2014 Programs in Need of Mentors:

     

    Discovery Room Science @ Home!  Pair up with a elementary school student and their family to bring science into their home by working together to prepare a science project for a school fair! Program runs October 27th - December 12th, 2014, 10 Mentors Needed, total time commitment ~ 6 hours over 6 weeks.

     

    Pittsburg Science Challenge! Work with at-risk youth to build their confidence and presentation skills while engaging them in the wonder of astrobiology as you help them prepare to give a short public science presentation for their class! Program runs October 27th - December 19th, 2014, 10 Mentors Needed, total time commitment ~ 10 hours over 7 weeks.

     

    Find out more about Fall 2014 Programs | Apply to be a mentor | Contact us

     

  • Tony Cairns (View all users posts) 20 Oct 2014 10:32pm ()

    How can teachers and administrators facilitate engagement between children and the scientific community?

    • Teachers should be scientists - that ways they come from the community and have links with it
    • Ako (or leachers learning teachers) should be scientists in method, methodology and mindfulness
    • Ako should live evey day every moment in and of it but also detached to analyse and actualize it
    • Ako should go to all events, places, lands, gathering, hui, drams, plays, labs, fields, shores, mountains to learn in and of the place, time and confluence of people and place
    • Ako need to know live and be their whakapapa, human, animal and elemental
    • Ako need to watch the 100 top DVDs from Science Art, Culture and humanity (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AinJrjHmkHOLdFd6My14QkFkeUo5dVo4Q05ZMUF4dkE&usp=sharing)
    • Ako need to know their scientific ancestors, colleagues, meme makers and mentors
    • Ako need all the books, blogs, sites and digital images to sustain interest and absorption
    • Ako need to experiment every class, every day, every week, every month, every year forever
    • Ako need to create current, valid, relevant, reliable data and research in an age/stage/phase appropriate, community of scholars but scaffolded environment

     

    Here’s what I am doing in PLD in 2014

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/11cMt3qJ9nFWiOnbul1erBfvFF65Fv8FGgoCeNyLqWF4/edit#heading=h.wx4anobwi0j1

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