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Indigenous cultures and e-Learning

Started by Aiono Manu Faaea-Semeatu 05 Nov 2013 2:09pm () Replies (22)

Recently I've been having discussions with colleagues around their perspectives on Māori and e-Learning, and Pasifika and e-Learning.  

We've been wrestling with the ideas around how Māori or Pasifika learners see their cultural identities within their learning, if e-Learning is the vehicle/tool/framework through which to raise their academic achievement.

Some concerns were raised around potential loss of cultural identities through focusing too much on the fixation on technology (negative consequence) compared to using e-Learning and technology as a way to celebrate cultural identities.  

Too often the focus can be on the segregation/separation of indigenous cultures and everything associated with cultural identities (multi-ethnic, intra-ethnic, bi-cultural, multi-cultural) from e-Learning, because people see them as separate, or may even value one over the other.

What are your thoughts on what TRUE INTEGRATION would look like?

What would be the best of both worlds?

How can blended e-Learning be a way or an approach to assist Māori and Pasifika learners in navigating their way to success?

What type of success are we talking about here? 

Replies

  • Roimata Baker (View all users posts) 07 Nov 2013 11:16pm ()

    Equity - yes this is so important.  We are having conversations about devices and access so that students can enjoy the benefits of Ako-E at home as well as at kura.  I'd like to see this access extend to marae.  Here we have rooms and another building that I'd love to see being used as a study hub for our tamariki.  It's ideal as it is so central.  

    For Kura Kaupapa Māori - developing the content and ensuring that staff are well supported with PD is vital to the success of Ako-E.  

    Jason I too have seen wonderful progress with boys.  It started with Photobooth book chats posted on Edmodo and it continues now with students writing their own short stories, emailing me at night for directions on how to log in so they can crack on and while I'm wary of never clocking out, I'm loving the fact that they want to work at home.  

    We need more apps in Māori.  We need to keep talking about this,  we need more PD.  Kia kaha ki a tātou katoa.

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