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The e-Learning Planning Framework - how and why to use it | NAPP Kōrero 16

Started by Karen Spencer 31 Jul 2012 9:14pm () Replies (309)

NAPP logoHaere mai to all NAPP akonga! Welcome to the Enabling e-Learning: Leadership group, and to this kōrero, exploring how we might use the e-Learning Planning Framework to help our schools develop future-focused learning for a digital world. On behalf of the Blended e-Learning team and our wider community, I hope you'll enjoy rich discussion over the coming weeks.Laughing


 How do you know what your school needs, in terms of using ICTs for effective learning? Where do you start to plan?

The e-Learning Planning Framework (English-medium), developed by Te Toi Tupu on behalf of the Ministry of Education, offers a roadmap to

  • support schools to review where they are, 
  • prioritise where they might go next, and 
  • plan the steps to get there.

The framework is supported by examples and resources for leaders and teachers, not least of which is the Enabling e-Learning hub on TKI and the VLN.  Have a look at this video below that unpacks the key ideas, and browse the links above.

What aspects of the framework look useful for your school - and why? How might you use it for planning?

Replies

  • Joan Hart (View all users posts) 10 Nov 2012 2:05pm ()

    Korero 16

    It’s a great tool to identify existing strengths and needs which enables these needs to be matched with outcomes, professional development and funding/resources required to meet the school’s vision and ensures the school measures the ongoing impact of planned actions.

    It's important for staff to have a buy in by not just identifying areas of strengths & weaknesses, needs, professional development required, but identifying the difference this learning could make to their teaching, management, planning and/or support of student’s learning. It is not the tool that is the important factor but the value it can bring to our core business.

    The supporting documents provide ideas and resources to help make a start.

    The most effect ICT training that has occurred in our school has been when it was in contexts that directly related to specific learning outcomes in the particular classroom or to the teachers specific needs (very individualised, small steps but ones that were being used from the beginning in an essential operation for that particular teacher, making that task easier, more effective, better targeted to the learning needs of the students…). Like all learning, the skill of the facilitator in enabling the student to gain independence, and the students engagement so they are an active learner is a crucial part otherwise the initiative dies when the facilitators focus is channeled in another direction.

    It does need to be said that highly sophisticated ICT systems require expert maintenance and schools and the ministry need to be prepared to fund this otherwise frustration with system failures becomes a big issue for teachers and learners. Large schools are in a better position to have this service on tap. Smaller isolated schools are more challenged in being able to have high caliber technical support readily available when hiccups occur.

  • Joan Hart (View all users posts) 12 Nov 2012 12:45pm ()

    Korero 16

    It’s a great tool to identify existing strengths and needs which enables these needs to be matched with outcomes, professional development and funding/resources required to meet the school’s vision and ensures the school measures the ongoing impact of planned actions.

    It's important for staff to have a buy in by not just identifying areas of strengths & weaknesses, needs, professional development required, but identifying the difference this learning could make to their teaching, management, planning and/or support of student’s learning. It is not the tool that is the important factor but the value it can bring to our core business.

    The supporting documents provide ideas and resources to help make a start.

    The most effect ICT training that has occurred in our school has been when it was in contexts that directly related to specific learning outcomes in the particular classroom or to the teachers specific needs (very individualised, small steps but ones that were being used from the beginning in an essential operation for that particular teacher, making that task easier, more effective, better targeted to the learning needs of the students…). Like all learning, the skill of the facilitator in enabling the student to gain independence, and the students engagement so they are an active learner is a crucial part otherwise the initiative dies when the facilitators focus is channeled in another direction.

    It does need to be said that highly sophisticated ICT systems require expert maintenance and schools and the ministry need to be prepared to fund this otherwise frustration with system failures becomes a big issue for teachers and learners. Large schools are in a better position to have this service on tap. Smaller isolated schools are more challenged in being able to have high caliber technical support readily available when hiccups occur.

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e-Learning: Leadership

e-Learning: Leadership

Exploring leadership for change, vision, policy and strategy that integrates ICTs into learning.