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BYOD User Agreement

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Started by Paula Jamieson 14 Nov 2011 1:26pm () Replies (17)

I am looking for research and examples of student user agreements to support the implementation of BYOD in NZ Primary Schools (have a few Australian ones and a couple of High School ones).

  • Have you addressed BYOD user agreements in your school?
  • What are your initial thoughts relating to these documents? What are your 'must haves'?

Lets discuss it,

Paula

Replies

  • Claire Amos (View all users posts) 14 Nov 2011 3:08pm ()

    Here are our resources around Digital citizenship Contracts.

    /pg/resources/claireamos/read/51302/digital-citizenship-contract-and-resources

    and our EGGS Online Booklet that refers to it as well:

    /pg/resources/claireamos/read/117811/eggs-online-elearning-at-epsom-girls-grammar-school

    Cheers

    Claire

  • Paula Jamieson (View all users posts) 14 Nov 2011 3:25pm ()

    Thanks for this Claire, lots to explore here. We are also hosting a Digital Citizenship workshop this week with Tessa Gray and our group of 24 lead teachers so this is perfect 'just in time learning' for us.

    Cheers

    Paula

  • Paula Jamieson (View all users posts) 14 Nov 2011 3:23pm ()

    Hi Mark,

    Thanks that sounds great, my email is

    paulaictpd@gmail.com

    All offers eagerly accepted Wink

    Cheers,

    Paula

  • caron sullivan (View all users posts) 05 Aug 2012 9:15am ()

    We adapted Tawa intermediate's agreement for our school, thanks Tawa. It covers most of the issues we could envisage and also after 4 weeks implementation nothing extra has cropped up.

    What has fascinated me on the security stakes is the kids indepenedence in this. I thought we migth have issues locking up gear at morning interval adn lunchtime. We wanted to do this because we are a full primary and didn't want the Yr & & 8 kids wandering around at breaks with full internet access. It hasn't been an issue, in fact the kids themselves pop their stuff in and control the lock up. Makes sense, they want their own gear safe. Plus if something does happen in break time it was their choice. Self management!

    We have a separate router system for the kids on a 9 - 3 timer to avoid accessing our system after school and on weekends.

  • Enabling e-Learning (View all users posts) 07 Mar 2012 2:40pm ()

    Hi there,

    Carolyn Stuart at Tawa Intermediate has kindly agreed that I can share the school's BYOD Policy/Agreement here, for your interest:

    >>> Tawa Intermediate BYOD Policy/Agreement

    Cheers.

    Karen M

  • eric pampalone (View all users posts) 10 Apr 2012 1:10pm ()

    Hi.  I have had a read through of your policy and was wondering if I could ask you some further questions about it?  We are trying to get a BYOD programme off the ground at Maungraki School and the more we dig, the more work we need to get done.  If you can get back to me at epampalone@maungaraki.school.nz it would be appreicated.

  • Gerard Macmanus (View all users posts) 10 May 2012 4:42pm ()

    How are schools dealing with the issues of inappropriate files on student owned device...

  • David Rankin (View all users posts) 17 May 2012 2:34pm ()

    I have posted a draft I am working on on my blog. Fell free to have a look.

  • Gerard Macmanus (View all users posts) 21 May 2012 10:00am ()

    There has been a couple of posts and articles of late around some of these concerns

    http://blog.netsafe.org.nz/2012/05/18/schools-seizing-ict-devices-and-renaming-netsafe-to-notsafe/

    I appeared on the May 16 episode of TVNZ7′s Back Benches to give some commentary around cyberbullying and the current law commission review. The show uses the twitter hashtag #backbenches. The producers don’t seem to have incorporated the tweets into the show, so maybe that is something they could look at in the future (assuming the show continues after the closure of TVNZ7). However, the panellists and guests can use the tweets as a way to review how they were perceived.

    For example, one tweet noted that “Crocker is full of Crock”. Assuming that Crocker was actually me, you could probably deduce that  at least one viewer wasn’t fully convinced by my arguments, or was being deliberately ironic – as I was speaking on the topic of Cyberbullying. I’m just glad he didn’t play the ‘drop the last two letters’ game with my actual surname.

    Other tweeters were more specific with their feedback. In an excellent example of how difficult it is to express one’s displeasure in 140 characters, one tweet stated “If NetSafe doesn’t come oppose rights of teachers &c to access students ‘ social media/phones, they should rename to NotSafe”. This was retweeted and another added that he was “not impressed with NetSafe”.

    The tweets referred to a question (and my answer) that referenced a request by the Secondary Principals Association for an extension to their search and seizure powers to combat cyber bullying. Specifically they want to be able to confiscate and, one presumes, analyse the confiscated device.

    There are existing guidelines that schools follow when they wish to search for ‘dangerous items’. However, the legality of searching and confiscating a students’ possessions is still debated. Most experts agree that a school can conduct a search so long as that search is “reasonable”. The NZ Bill of Rights protects us from ‘unreasonable search or seizure’. ‘Reasonable’, and indeed ‘unreasonable’ are relative terms obviously. So too is ‘dangerous item’ for that matter.

    Many schools monitor all activity on their ICT systems, and their right to do this is widely accepted. The problem is that students use devices that are not connected to the school network (such as cellphones) and use those to bully other students.

    My understanding was that schools could already confiscate devices if:

    (1)They have identified to students that any ICT device being used in the school is subject to the schools’ ICT policy,

    (2) The school policy specifically includes a provision for confiscation and analysis and

    (3) The school has reasonable grounds to exercise that power (and does so in a reasonable way).

    So that’s a different answer to saying “NetSafe wholeheartedly endorses the Associations request”. Do students have a right to feel safe at school? Yes they do. In fact Schools are obligated to “provide a safe physical and emotional environment for students” under the National Administrative Guideline number Five. Are school therefore obligated to combat cyberbullying? Yes they are. If they don’t – their school would be NotSafe (see what I did there?) Are schools currently empowered to combat cyberbullying – and able to meet their statutory requirement to create a safe environement? Not according to the Secondary Principals Association.

    Of course, Cyberbullying isn’t the only ‘danger’ students need to be protected from. For example, students also have a right to privacy and freedom of expression. Everything really hinges on this idea of “reasonable” – so there will never be a simple definitive answer.

    Also, my understanding was that the Associations request did not extend to accessing students private social networking accounts- which I think Damien added to his question on the night.  As we have previously stated with reference to employers making that request – that is not ‘reasonable’.

  • Gerard Macmanus (View all users posts) 21 May 2012 10:02am ()

    As well as http://www.zdnet.com/blog/igeneration/the-implications-of-schools-demanding-access-to-student-mobile-devices/16255

    Summary: Schools are demanding the right to search smartphones and laptops in a bid to catch cyberbullying. What are the implications?

    <:ARTICLE>

    Principals in New Zealand are lobbying for a change in legislation that would allow schools to search mobile devices when students are on school property for evidence of cyberbullying.

    The report indicates that as a way to change how schools deal with the ongoing issue of cyberbullying, principals want to shift from restorative justice to the suspension of bullies — with evidence gleaned from being able to legally access student’s mobile devices.

    As the backlash from the parents of affected students increases, schools are looking for ways that they can legally monitor cyberbullying — which usually takes the form of text messages or communication across social networks.

    Stuff.nz reports that Secondary Principals’ Association president Patrick Walsh is working with the Ministry of Education in order to try and give principals this power, which means they can search and confiscate mobile phones, laptops or any kind of digital device.

    If the request proves successful, it may become a precedent for other countries to follow. Walsh said:

    “Cyber-bullying has become so common and the consequences so serious, that it overrides privacy concerns.
    To discover evidence of cyber-bullying or other inappropriate behaviour, it would be a necessary extension to search and seizure powers.”

    Last year, guidelines were put in place to allow educators to search their students for drugs and weapons. Now, principals want this to be put in to law — as a means to also control cyerbullying.

    A recent study by the Pew Internet & American Life project stated that 95 percent of teenagers aged between 12-17 are now online, and 41 percent of those surveyed revealed that they have witnessed cruel behaviour online either ‘frequently’ or ‘sometimes’.

    As cyberbullying is not a physical act in itself, although it may lead to physical situations, attempting to control it raises a host of issues. It may blur the lines between on-school and off-school free speech, and could put a school’s duty of care responsibilities in to question. The current legal system can be considered out-of-date, as expanding social networking and the increased use of mobile devices are not necessarily accounted for in current legal systems.

    Giving educators access to these devices on school grounds may be a way to help combat the problem, but in reality, this approach may make little difference. Just because a principal could be allowed to view a mobile device does not mean they will know what to look for, and it also brings up another host of implications:

    - Social networking sites and terms of use - By giving a third-party access, students may be breaking service agreements with sites they are present on.
    - Privacy: It may lead to a trend where safety is placed before privacy rights, but this in turn could become a slippery slope, and where would lines have to be drawn?
    - Data protection: To what degree would confiscation result in data access, and would any linked account be open to investigation - including social networking and email? If a laptop is taken, does that translate into the right to pry in to folders, images and video — or would educators be restricted to online activity (and therefore be able to scour the history folders?)
    - Parental opinion. Parents may want more security in terms of combating cyberbullies, but will they be happy with schools monitoring their children’s behavior online?
    - Children but not adults? If employers cannot ask potential employees for access to Facebook accounts, why can teachers ask students?

    A ministry spokesman has confirmed Walsh had provided advice to officials, but no decisions have officially been made.

  • Gerard Macmanus (View all users posts) 23 Jun 2012 1:18pm ()

    here is the ver 2 draft of our BYOD agreement

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/17eclOkKac6dyTbKcAQEJYE8ExPEFl2i_YEK0bePImY8/edit

    BYOD Acceptable Use


    BYOD = Bring Your Own Device

    BYOD Agreement Form and Protocol for the Use of Technology on Campus
    As new technologies continue to change the world in which we live, they also provide many new and positive educational benefits for classroom instruction. To encourage this growth, students at St Bede’s College may now bring their own technology to campus.

    Definition of “Technology”
    For purposes of BYOD, “Technology” means a privately owned wireless and/or portable electronic handheld equipment that includes, but is not limited to, existing and emerging mobile communication systems and smart technologies, portable internet devices, Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), handheld entertainment systems or portable information technology systems that can be used for word processing, wireless Internet access, image capture/recording, sound recording and information transmitting/receiving/storing, etc.

    Internet
    Only the internet gateway provided by the school may be accessed while on campus. Personal internet connective devices such as but not limited to cell phones / cell network adapters are not permitted to be used to access outside internet sources at any time.

    Security and Damages
    Responsibility to keep the device secure rests with the individual owner. The St Bede’s College System, nor its staff or employees, is not liable for any device stolen or damaged on campus. If a device is stolen or damaged, it will be handled through the administrative office similar to other personal artifacts that are impacted in similar situations. It is recommended that skins (decals) and other custom touches are used to physically identify your device from others. Additionally, protective cases for technology are encouraged.

    BYOD St Bede’s College Student Agreement
    The use of technology to provide educational material is not a necessity but a privilege. A student does not have the right to use his or her laptop, cell phone or other electronic device while at school. When abused, privileges will be taken away. When respected, they will benefit the learning environment as a whole. Students and parents/guardians participating in BYOD must adhere to the Student Code of Conduct, as well as all Board policies, particularly Internet Acceptable Use and Internet Safety. Additionally, technology:

    • Must be in silent mode while on school campuses and while riding school buses.
    • May not be used to cheat on assignments or tests.
    • May only be used to access files on computer or internet sites which are relevant to the classroom curriculum. Games are not permitted.


    Students acknowledge that:

    • The school's network filters will be applied to one's connection to the internet and attempts will not be made to bypass them.
    • Bringing on premises or infecting the network with a Virus, Trojan, or program designed to damage, alter, destroy, or provide access to unauthorized data or information is in violation of Student Acceptable Use Policy.
    • Processing or accessing information on school property related to “hacking”, altering, or bypassing network security policies is in violation of Student Acceptable Use Policy.
    • St Bede’s College has the right to collect and examine any device that is suspected of causing problems or was the source of an attack or virus infection.
    • The college has the right to inspect files on any device bought on campus irrespective of if it has been the cause of a problem/ attack / virus (This covers devices that may contain pornography / objectionable material obtained offsite and stored on Student Owned Device)
    • Files may have to be saved on the C drive of the laptop, a jump drive, an external drive, or another media device.
    • It is the owner’s responsibility for the repair of any malfunctioning / damaged devices. The St Bede’s College does not supply technical services for student owned devices.
    • Personal technology is charged prior to bringing it to school and runs off its own battery while at school. Charging your device will be available on a limited basis and is at the discretion of the classroom teacher.


    As new technologies continue to change the world in which we live, they also provide many new and positive educational benefits for classroom instruction. To encourage this growth, students at St Bede’s College may now bring their own technology to campus.



    BYOD Agreement

    Please review and sign the BYOD agreement between parents and students. No student will be permitted to use personal technology devices unless the agreement is signed and returned.

    Students and parents participating in BYOD must adhere to the St Bede’s College Student Code of conduct, as well as all Board policies, particularly Internet Acceptable User Policy and Internet Safety Policy. Please read carefully and initial every statement:

    _____ Students take full responsibility for their devices. The school is not responsible for the security of personal technology. Personal devices cannot be left at school before or after the school hours.

    _____ Devices cannot be used during assessments, unless otherwise directed by a teacher.

    _____ Students must immediately comply with teachers’ requests to shut down devices or close the screen. Devices must be in silent mode and put away when asked by teachers.

    _____ Students are not permitted to transmit or post photographic images/videos of any person on campus on public and/or social networking sites.

    _____ Personal devices must be charged prior to bringing them to school and run off their own batteries while at school. Charging will be available on a limited basis and is up to teacher discretion.

    _____ To ensure appropriate network filters, students will only use the BYOD wireless connection in school and will not attempt to bypass the network restrictions by using 3G or 4G network.

    _____ Students understand that bringing devices on premises or infecting the network with a Virus, Trojan, or program designed to damage, alter, destroy, or provide access to unauthorized data or information is in violation of the AUP policy and will result in disciplinary actions. The school has the right to collect and examine any device that is suspected of causing problems or is the source of an attack or virus infection.

    _____ The college has the right to inspect files on any device bought on campus irrespective of if it has been the cause of a problem/ attack / virus (This covers devices that may contain pornography / objectionable material obtained offsite and stored on Student Owned Device)

    _____ It is the owner’s responsibility for the repair of any malfunctioning / damaged devices. The St Bede’s College does not supply technical services for student owned devices.

    _____ Students should not physically share their personal devices with other students, unless they have written parent permission to do so.


    Please understand that the use of personal devices to support educational experience is not a necessity but a privilege. With respect of the rules, this privilege will benefit the learning environment as a whole. When rules are abused, privileges will be taken away.

    I understand and will abide by the above policy and guidelines. I further understand that any violation is unethical and may result in the loss of my technology privileges as well as other disciplinary action.
    Device Inventory
    If the student will be participating in BYOD, please check all devices that apply.
    _____ iPad _____ iTouch _____ iPhone _____ MacBook _____ Laptop
    _____ Netbook _____ Notebook
    _____ Smartphone (Type)_____________________________________
    _____ Tablet (Type) _________________________________________

    MAC Address of device
    Serial Number of device

    Printed student name: __________________________________________________

    _____________________________________________
    Signature of Student

    Date ______ / _______ / _____

    Printed parent name: __________________________________________________

    _____________________________________________
    Signature of Parent

  • Gerard Macmanus (View all users posts) 03 Jul 2012 5:56pm ()

    As we progress though this more, I have found a document relating to "Search and Confiscation" produced by the Ministry of Education http://www.minedu.govt.nz/~/media/MinEdu/Files/Boards/Support/SearchingStudentsAndConfiscation.pdf

    In Appendix One - Senarios 

    A group of primary school students has reported to their teacher that a student (Student W) was showing other students a pornographic movie on his laptop during a break. Pornography presents a risk to other students.
    Staff are now considering what to do next:
    Staff should first consider the information they have and consider the reports from the other students. They should ask themselves: Are the students who have reported the issue viewed as credible? Do their individual accounts of the events match? Where were the witnesses in relation to the laptop?
    If staff believe the accounts of students are credible, they should put allegations to Student W and staff should consider what Student W has to say. At this point the situation may resolve itself if the student admits wrongdoing and/or opens up their laptop to show staff what it contains. 

    If staff believe that the Student W’s laptop does contain pornography what do they do next?
    Staff should consider:

    • Whether there is an imminent risk to the physical or emotional safety of students or staff and in what circumstances could harm occur? In this case if the laptop is not turned on students will be safe irrespective of what it contains.
    • Whether the laptop or the student’s bag (containing the laptop) can simply be confiscated? There is probably no need to find or view the pornography to ensure the safety of other students. The laptop or the bag it is in will probably be in clear view and could be easily confiscated. 

    The other points staff need to consider may include:

    • Contacting Student W’s parents/caregivers.
    • Taking action to manage Student W’s behaviour which may include considering whether there are good ground for disciplinary action (note that in a school environment a student does not need to be caught in an unsafe act (“red-handed”) before staff can take action in response to a student’s behaviour). 
    • Providing guidance and counselling to Student W.
    • Changing a school’s rules or practices around students’ use of laptops.

    The effect on others

    All the students who viewed the pornography may need some support or counselling.
    Parents and caregivers should also be told if their children have been affected by such an incident.

     

    I suggest people read the information provided by the ministry in this booklet.

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