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Denise Johnson's discussion posts

  • Denise Johnson 15 Dec 2015 12:04pm () in 21 questions about learner experience

    Thanks Ed for this post - great questions and ones that we will definitely be using with our staff as we explore how we as teachers can respond to students' needs more quickly and efficiently!

  • Denise Johnson 19 Nov 2015 5:19pm () in Sustainable Strategies: Integrating e-learning, leadership inquiry and classroom practice | Kōrero 14 2015

    As a school we were really excited to jump on the bandwagon and bring in BYOD. However the most valuable thing it has taught me about leadership is to lead by co constructing a vision for e-learning first! Create one using staff, student and Whānau voice, as well as professional experts and then you are all on the journey together. If not, then things quickly fall apart and it is not sustainable as the foundations haven’t been put in place.

    Once your vision as a school is created then as the principal and ICT director from Sacred Heart College indicated the keys to success are:-

    • to be collaborative (both within your school and the wider community)

    • to scaffold each other’s learning, using the principle of  ako as no one has all the answers and often students know more than the teachers

    • Giving regular time for practice.

    • Create systems to help teachers manage and monitor online learning otherwise it can become very daunting for many.

    • As a leader, lead using the inquiry cycle so that both staff are constantly reflecting and considering ICT and how it can be used effectively for  learning schoolwide.

    Visions can change and evolve as staff and students develop changing needs but without one to begin with, e-learning can quickly become overshadowed with problems not solutions.

    As I have made this journey over this year, regarding our e-learning vision, I have found the VLN forums to be a fantastic avenue for ideas and expert advice so thanks to all those who have posted some great ideas and learning!

  • Denise Johnson 19 Oct 2015 4:34pm () in Resourcing how and why of e-Learning | NAPP Kōrero 6 2015

    Google docs certainly opens up whole new ways of communicating I agree Tracy. 

    If you haven’t already done so  - this link is well worth reading - Poor technology leadership is usually just poor leadership  If you are part of the leadership journey of developing a vision for your school regarding e-Learning then Scott McLeod’s statements provide a good benchmark to measure yourself against.  Quite a challenging article to read and reflect on.

     

    As we build our school vision and discuss what is happening with BYOD for us, one point that we are debating in the staffroom is what guidance do we give parents as to what devices we would like the children to have. For all those who have just been to the uLearn conference, you will probably be like our colleague who is really excited about the potential that the ipads have, and as a result this really generated the discussion as some parents want the heads up as to what to purchase for their child. However as a Year 7 & 8 teacher I am also aware of some our feeder schools (beginning next year) with it being compulsory for Yr 9s to have a certain type of BYOD. So I’d be keen to have some feedback as to how primary schools have managed this debate and what feedback those of you from secondary schools can give.

     
  • Denise Johnson 09 Sep 2015 7:20am () in Resourcing how and why of e-Learning | NAPP Kōrero 6 2015

    Having had the experience of BYOD being adopted without a school wide vision being developed in collaboration with both staff and students, I have experienced the pitfalls of not seeing the importance of the vision being in place first. As you commented Geoff we need  work together in order to build understanding and capability with  pedagogy at the centre. For that reason the diagram Claire that you posted is a helpful and succinct tool to support teachers on the focusing  on our pedagogy that leads learning in the 21st century. Likewise Anna B’s post about TPACK, her links and questions and particularly her statement of  “When there is strategic direction for e-learning, I think transformational learning can occur for students “ is so true and has been of great benefit for me as I have begun leading the development of our school vision for e-learning.

    We have gone back to the drawing board and one of the discussions we have had to kick start discussion is to consider whether we are a digital native or a digital immigrant? It has been an interesting question to reflect on as issues of launching the classroom blogs have been discussed and debated, and whether we are native or an immigrant certainly colours the discussion.

    Marc Prensky, the American writer and speaker on learning and education; who popularised the above terms, challenges us to consider how do we engage with our children/ students in the 21st century? As he says “Digital Immigrants  look at technology as a tool, we say “we have an interactive whiteboard, we have this and that tool.” Digital Natives look at technology as a foundation, it underlies everything they do and it is integrated into everything they do – communicating, sharing, buying, selling, learning, gaming – We all do these things but Digital Natives have invented ways in which to do this online - they communicate through instant messaging and chat; they share through blogs and myspace; they buy and sell through Trade Me;  they learn from wikipedia ; they game online. In summary they have an online life as they want to be connected - they want community. So yes Claire I definitely agree - start with the students first!

     
  • Denise Johnson 09 Sep 2015 7:20am () in Resourcing how and why of e-Learning | NAPP Kōrero 6 2015

    Having had the experience of BYOD being adopted without a school wide vision being developed in collaboration with both staff and students, I have experienced the pitfalls of not seeing the importance of the vision being in place first. As you commented Geoff we need  work together in order to build understanding and capability with  pedagogy at the centre. For that reason the diagram Claire that you posted is a helpful and succinct tool to support teachers on the focusing  on our pedagogy that leads learning in the 21st century. Likewise Anna B’s post about TPACK, her links and questions and particularly her statement of  “When there is strategic direction for e-learning, I think transformational learning can occur for students “ is so true and has been of great benefit for me as I have begun leading the development of our school vision for e-learning.

    We have gone back to the drawing board and one of the discussions we have had to kick start discussion is to consider whether we are a digital native or a digital immigrant? It has been an interesting question to reflect on as issues of launching the classroom blogs have been discussed and debated, and whether we are native or an immigrant certainly colours the discussion.

    Marc Prensky, the American writer and speaker on learning and education; who popularised the above terms, challenges us to consider how do we engage with our children/ students in the 21st century? As he says “Digital Immigrants  look at technology as a tool, we say “we have an interactive whiteboard, we have this and that tool.” Digital Natives look at technology as a foundation, it underlies everything they do and it is integrated into everything they do – communicating, sharing, buying, selling, learning, gaming – We all do these things but Digital Natives have invented ways in which to do this online - they communicate through instant messaging and chat; they share through blogs and myspace; they buy and sell through Trade Me;  they learn from wikipedia ; they game online. In summary they have an online life as they want to be connected - they want community. So yes Claire I definitely agree - start with the students first!