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  • Geoff Harris 21 Sep 2011 12:51pm () in Key Issues with New Level 2 Visual Arts Standards

    Integrated programmes

    -          2.1 used to directly inform 2.2/2.3

    -          2.1 delivered in conjunction with 2.2/2.3 – Cyclical shifts between formal research and practical application

    -          Same evidence contributes towards assessment decisions for 2.2/2.3 – Using a different assessment ‘lens’

     

    Explanatory Note One – Level 7

    This achievement standard is derived from The New Zealand Curriculum, Learning Media, Ministry of Education, 2007, Level 7 strands, Understanding the Visual Arts in Context, Developing Practical Knowledge in the Visual Arts, Developing Ideas in the Visual Arts and Communicating and Interpreting in the Visual Arts.

     

    Appropriate Artist Models

    Teachers need to ensure that students select appropriate artist models.  Typically this means that artists used for each standard may be related by a particular thematic of conceptual approach, but differ in terms of personal style.  A useful strategy is to identify a particular theme and then allow students to select from lists of traditional, contemporary, and New Zealand approaches to this theme.

     

    For 2.1 and 2.2 it is strongly recommended that students use artist models from within the field of the standard.  For 2.3 students may explore artists form outside to field to extend ideas as long as these artists are used as well as, rather than instead of, the field specific artist models.  Where other practices are explored, they should relate directly to the methods and ideas particular to that field.  For example, Joseph Cornell assemblages relate very well to painting pictorial concerns, whereas Len Lye’s Wind Wand has limited connection with painting characteristics and constraints.

     

    Student directed learning

    At level two it is recommended that teachers enable students to exercise a degree of self determination in the selection of artist models and/or thematic approaches.  A useful strategy is to begin with a class programme and then progressively allow students to develop their own ideas in independent directions.

     

    Assessment schedules

    Teachers will have noticed the expended definitions in the judgement columns of the assessment schedules of the resources for new standards.  These have been developed for clarification purposes.  In the context of teacher self generated assessment materials, the unexpanded achievement criteria is sufficient for delivery and moderation purposes.

     

    Exemplars

    Exemplars have been developed for each standard in each field.  The exemplars are paired at each cusp N+/A-, A+/M-, M+/E-.  It is critical that teachers closely read the accompanying commentaries to be clear on the specific strengths and weaknesses of each exemplar rather than seeing the samples as generic representations of the grade level.

     

     

    2.1

     

    Established practice - works by artists that are recognised as belonging to a particular genre, style, convention, or way of working. This involves the investigation of solutions found in past and contemporary practice. Contemporary and or New Zealand artists recommended.

     

    Appropriate to (field) - characteristics, constraints, conventions of the field. 

     

    Methods & Ideas – How Methods (Materials, techniques, composition, colour etc) are used to communicate Ideas (theme, effect, meaning, symbolism)

    Meaning and context – Key areas for discussion rather than technical/pictorial features – What is the artist saying? How do they communicate this? How does this relate to the wider cultural context? (Social, political, historical, geographic, personal)

     

    Scope – At least four different approaches (x4 artists, or 2x different approaches from 2 artists)

     

    Sources – Research sources such as books, magazines, internet – quotes, references to methods/ideas not immediately apparent in the art works (bibliography = good practice)

     

    Use of templates – Research tools not presentation formats

     

    Formal Teaching – Sustained instruction lessons/lectures – about methods/ideas/contexts prior to students commencing research investigations.

     

    Biographical Information – Only relevant where it impact directly on the ideas/methods that underpin the work

     

    Types of Evidence – Evidence may be in the form of written notes or verbal presentations (audio recordings or transcripts provided for moderation and archive purposes)

     

    Sufficiency – students will have limited opportunity to meet the four credit level two expectations for achieved without explaining ten key features of four relevant art works (or the equivalent of this)

     

    Barriers to Achievement

    -          Insufficient time to undertake sustained investigations

    -          Descriptions/Lists of features rather than explanations of how features used to communicate ideas

     

    Achieved  - Demonstrate an understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to (field)

    -          Demonstrate understanding refers to identifying and documenting information about methods and ideas from established practice, with reference to the context in which artworks are made, viewed and valued.

    -          uses correct terminology

    -          identifies technical features

    -          describes how features are used to create effects or communicate meaning

    -          makes references to wider contexts – social, geographic, cultural, historic

    -          makes general comments about artist or movement

     

    Merit  - Demonstrate an informed understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to (field)

    -          Demonstrate informed understanding refers to identifying and documenting particular information about how methods and ideas from established practice are used with reference to the context in which artworks are made, viewed and valued.

    -          uses a range of specific terminology correctly

    -          unpacks technical features and explains how these are unique to the artist

    -          explains how features are used to create effects or communicate meaning

    -          makes links with approaches of other artists (influences)

    -          makes links to wider contexts – social, geographic, cultural, historic

    -          evidence of independent study – information from research sources not immediately apparent in the work itself

    -          links general understanding to the specific features of particular art works

     

    Excellence - Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to (field)

    -          Demonstrate in-depth understanding refers to identifying and documenting particular information through the analysis of methods and ideas from established practice, in order to explain how and why art works are related to the context in which they are made, viewed and valued.

    -          uses a range of specific terminology correctly

    -          unpacks technical features and explains how these are unique to the artist and how they change within the artists oeuvre

    -          explains how features are used to create effects or communicate meaning

    -          explains links with approaches of other artists (influences)

    -          explains links with wider social, political, geographic, historical, and cultural contexts

    -          evidence of sustained independent study – information from a range of research sources not immediately apparent in the work itself

    -          may include original ideas supported by evidence form research sources and/or the work itself

    -          explains how specific features reflect or reject the general features of artist or movement

     

    2.2

     

    Annotations – summarise particular methods and ideas – brief notes

     

    Range versus depth – consideration for departments – broad range to provide rich foundation (four or more approaches) OR narrow range to enhance depth of knowledge (three or less approaches)

     

    Technical conventions – processes, procedures, materials, techniques, with reference to media, surface, colour, style, tone, perspective, line, form, texture (elements)

     

    Pictorial conventions – composition, depth, balance, harmony, rhythm, tension (principles)

     

    Conceptual / Communicative Conventions - treatment of subject matter, juxtaposition of imagery, symbolism, metaphor, narrative (ideas)

     

    Appropriate Conventions – using the unique characteristics and constraints of the field

    -          Painting drawing may include drawing notes, sketches, monochromatic and colour studies, collage, and painting

    -          Photography drawing may include sketches, compositional notes, proof sheets, working prints, photograms, collage, montage and photographs.

    -          Printmaking drawing may include sketches, drawing notes, monochromatic and/or colour studies, collage, proofs and prints.

    -          Sculpture drawing may include drawing in two-dimensions, three-dimensions, sketches, drawing notes, worksheets, plans, models, maquettes and photocollage.

    -          Design drawing may include research, analysis, recording, concept visualisation, roughs, prototypes, models and evaluative notes, refinements and solutions.

     

    Emulations – faithful reproduction of a particular art work – useful starting position but tends to operating within the Achieved grade range

     

    Applications – (may be explicit or implicit) applying selected technical or pictorial/conceptual approaches to own subject matter – provide opportunity to demonstrate specific or in-depth knowledge

     

    Sufficiency – students will have limited opportunity to meet the four credit level two expectations for achieved without producing at least six A3 pages over a period of six weeks duration (of equivalent)

     

    Barriers to Achievement

    -          Evidence that does not relate to the specific field conventions (3D evidence for sculpture)

     

    Achieved - Use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to (field)

    -      Apply knowledge involves using processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions when making artworks.

    -      Identifies and gathers appropriate resource material 

    -      Applies appropriate stages of development such as under painting, test strips, etc

    -      Technical field appropriate skill in use of media for an intended purpose – recording, decorative, geometric

    -      Pictorial conventions from established practice or specific artist applied in own work

    -      Attempts to use technical and pictorial conventions to support an idea

     

    Merit - Use drawing methods to apply specific knowledge of conventions appropriate to (field)

    -          Apply specific knowledge involves selecting and using particular processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions according to an intended purpose when making artworks.

    -          Generates appropriate resource material

    -          Successfully manages all stages of development such as under painting, test strips, etc

    -          Consistent field appropriate technical skills used successfully for intended purpose - recording, decorative, geometric

    -          Pictorial conventions from established practice or specific artist applied successfully in own work

    -          Uses technical and pictorial conventions to support an idea

     

    Excellence - Use drawing methods to apply in-depth knowledge of conventions appropriate to (field)

    -          Apply in-depth knowledge involves critically selecting and using particular processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions according to an intended purpose when making artworks.

    -          Generates a range of appropriate resource material in an ongoing process

    -          Uses sound understanding of developmental stages to enhance success of outcomes

    -          Variety of field appropriate technical skills used with consistent success for intended purpose - recording, decorative, geometric

    -          A variety of pictorial conventions from established practice or specific artist applied with consistent success in own work

    -          Successfully uses technical and pictorial conventions to enhance an idea

     

    2.3

     

    Proposition – pictorial, conceptual, thematic content of personal investigation – articulate students’ aims and intentions

     

    Annotations –evaluate strengths and weaknesses of preceding work to inform development of new work – may include brief notes about the key conventions of the methods and ideas of artists

     

    Applications – (may be explicit or implicit) applying selected technical or pictorial/conceptual approaches to own subject matter – provide opportunity to develop ideas – sustained application can lead to the clarification of ideas

     

    Synthesis and Extension – Combining methods and ideas from a range of approaches with own innovations and modifications – provides enhanced opportunity to clarify ideas and necessary for the extension of ideas

     

    Critical Editing – Sequencing and size of images to indicate selective hierarchy and articulate the developmental journey

     

    Technical conventions – processes, procedures, materials, techniques, with reference to media, surface, colour, style, tone, perspective, line, form, texture (elements)

     

    Pictorial conventions – composition, depth, balance, harmony, rhythm, tension (principles)

     

    Conceptual / Communicative Conventions - treatment of subject matter, juxtaposition of imagery, symbolism, metaphor, narrative (ideas)

     

    Established practice - works by artists that are recognised as belonging to a particular genre, style, convention, or way of working. This involves the investigation of solutions found in past and contemporary practice. Contemporary and or New Zealand artists recommended.

     

    Appropriate Conventions –using the unique characteristics and constraints of the field

    -          Painting drawing may include drawing notes, sketches, monochromatic and colour studies, collage, and painting.

    -          Photography drawing may include sketches, compositional notes, proof sheets, working prints, photograms, collage, montage and photographs.

    -          Printmaking drawing may include sketches, drawing notes, monochromatic and/or colour studies, collage, proofs and prints.

    -          Sculpture drawing may include drawing in two-dimensions, three-dimensions, sketches, drawing notes, worksheets, plans, models, maquettes and photocollage.

    -          Design drawing may include research, analysis, recording, concept visualisation, roughs, prototypes, models and evaluative notes, refinements and solutions.

     

    Related series refers to a set of drawings that demonstrate a connection – can be a body of related outcomes or a cohesive developmental sequence

     

    Revisiting – returning to initial subject matter and/or ideas with alternative approaches or new experience/knowledge – useful strategy to advance personal ideas

     

    Sufficiency – students will have limited opportunity to meet the four credit level two expectations for achieved without producing at least six A3 pages over a period of six weeks duration (of equivalent)

     

    Barriers to Achievement

    -          Episodic – variety of unrelated approaches – not conscious development of a particular idea

    -          Creative Play – experimenting with technical effects or componentry without advancing the idea in a meaningful or purposeful way.

     

    Achieved - Develop ideas in a related series of drawings appropriate to established (field)

    -          Develop ideas refers to building on, interpreting and responding to a concept, subject matter, problem or situation, in drawings informed by established practice.

    -          Defines a particular pictorial or conceptual idea

    -          Gathers appropriate resource material / imagery

    -          Applies appropriate stages of development

    -          Explores a range of approaches to a given idea in a conscious way to build upon the idea

    -          Later works reveal some consideration of preceding investigation.

    -          Outcomes use appropriate to field conventions

    -          Outcomes appropriate to level two status of standard (Level 7 of NZC as per EN1)

     

    Merit - Clarify ideas in a related series of drawings appropriate to established (field)

    -          Clarify ideas involves analysing, reflecting on, and further developing a concept, subject matter, problem or situation, in drawings appropriate to established practice.

    -          Defines a particular pictorial or conceptual idea

    -          Gathers a variety of appropriate resource material / imagery

    -          Demonstrates sound skills throughout the stages of development

    -          Identifies and advances a particular approach to the proposition

    -          The investigation shows the systematic approach to developing ideas

    -          Later works clearly build upon the evaluation of the preceding investigation

    -          Outcomes show understanding and consistent control of field conventions

    -          Outcomes comfortably meet the level two expectations of standard (Level 7 of NZC as per EN1)

     

    Excellence - Extend ideas in a related series of drawings appropriate to established (field)

    -          Extend ideas involves critically analysing, evaluating, and further developing a concept, subject matter, problem or situation, in drawings appropriate to established practice.

    -          Defines a particular pictorial or conceptual idea

    -          Gathers a wide range of appropriate resource material / imagery

    -          Evaluates and innovates throughout the stages of development.

    -          A sustained advancement of a given proposition in new or unexpected directions

    -          A cohesive systematic approach is sustained throughout the investigation

    -          All aspects of the investigation are clearly informed by the ongoing valuation of the students’ work

    -          Outcomes show mastery of field conventions and emergence of innovative practice

    -          Outcomes begin to exceed the level two expectations of the standard (Level 7 of NZC as per EN1)

     

    2.5

     

    Assessment evidence - It is the intention of the standard that teachers and students are able to select from a wide range of approaches.  The final outcome (resolved work) should reflect the quantitative and qualitative expectations of the four credit weighting and level two status of the standard.

     

    Resolved refers to work that is complete and realises an intention.  This may be within the scope of a particular field, or combine field conventions, or operate outside the five visual arts fields eg – video, costume, ect

     

    Planning and developmental evidence- Preparatory research, concept drawing, and exploring particular materials and techniques may be essential aspects of the learning sequence but do not contribute directly towards assessment evidence for this standard.  Assessment decisions need to be made exclusively on the qualities of the final outcome.  This evidence may be assessed within the context of the preceding Visual Arts achievement standards.

     

    It may be useful to supply planning evidence for moderation purposes to enhance moderators understanding of the genesis and context of the resolve work.

     

    Cultural Conventions - Before commencing learning sequences for this standard, it is critical teachers clearly define particular characteristics and constraints associated with the selected ‘cultural context’ (design intentions and technical parameters). Cultural conventions are defined as the customs, formalities, practices and protocols that relate to the shared knowledge and values of a specific way of working, society, cultural or ethnic group.  Traditional and/or ethnic practices may include: whakairo, siapo, tivaevae.  Contemporary and/or wider cultural practices may include: street art, mural making, knitting, jewellery, tattoo, mask making.

     

    For example the elements and skills appropriate to the cultural context of a Viral video (Graffiti painting on the move – see exemplars for 2.5B) include:

    Technical conventions – editing, software, framing, viewpoint, tracking, panning, sound track, credits

    Conceptual conventions – narrative, pace, genre references, humour, irony

     

    Group Work - Group projects need to allow individual contributions to be identified for assessment purposes.  Strategies for this may include:

    -          Allocate individual sections of the total project to each student

    -          Develop individual marquettes/outcomes for assessment purposes

     

    Achieved - Produce a resolved work that demonstrates control of skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

    -          Produce a resolved work that demonstrates control of skills appropriate to cultural conventions involves the ability to manage media according to an intention.

    -          Resolved work adheres to the identified conceptual conventions – form, style, size, materials

    -          Resolved work uses appropriate technical conventions - processes, procedures, materials

     

    Merit - Produce a resolved work that demonstrates sustained control of skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

    -          Produce a resolved work that demonstrates sustained control of skills appropriate to cultural conventions involves the consistent management of processes, procedures, materials and techniques.

    -          Resolved work demonstrates understanding of identified conceptual conventions in a successful design that clearly adheres to a recognised practice

    -          Resolved work demonstrates effective use of technical conventions to create intended effects.

     

    Excellence - Produce a resolved work that demonstrates facility with skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

    -          Produce a resolved work that demonstrates facility with skills appropriate to cultural conventions involves the easy and ready control with which skills are applied.

    -          Resolved work demonstrates successful personal responses that sit within a recognised practice.

    -          High levels of technical skills are used to enhance the effectiveness of the work.

     

     

  • Geoff Harris 16 Sep 2011 10:29am () in 3rd Session - Wednesday 21st

    Hi all. 

    Now that we have quickly covered all four internal standards, the third session provides an opportunity for you to ask specific questions about any standard or evidence in relation to standards.  You are welcome to test out planning ideas or post images of student work/writing to find out where it fits best in relation to the new standards. 

    Images should be compressed to less than 1.5MB and need to be uploaded then embedded in this discussion post. If you have trouble getting them to stick then email them to me with your comments and/or questions at Geoff.Harris@nzqa.govt.nz and I'll upload them for you.

  • Geoff Harris 16 Sep 2011 10:22am () in 2nd Session

    As a follow up to last Wednedsay see below for the Low Acheived 2.5 sample I was talking about before Sam pointed out that what was saying didn't appear to match the Merit sample I posted earlier.  How embarrasing.

    image