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Keri Tataurangi's discussion posts

  • Keri Tataurangi 15 Nov 2014 3:43pm () in 2014: Principals’ Leadership applied to strategic planning for the integration of technologies across the school community | NAPP Kōrero 14

    How can principals lead planning that integrates the e-learning planning framework with a schools’ strategic plan and student achievement?

    My thinking…

    • A Principal needs to be up with the play. As a Principal I would have to lead from the front. Be prepared to ‘muck in’ and learn alongside the staff if necessary. Be ready, do your homework…
    • Asking for help is key. If I don’t know about something I would ask for help, read, research, upskill.  I have learned from talking with various Principals this year that if you don’t know – admit it and don’t make it up!
    • Use the resources available – Online, literature, collegial – Use the resources! I don’t have to know everything, but I do need to know how I can access what I need to know. 
    • Be honest with yourself… and the staff and community. Is there someone out there that can support the learning? - engage them!
    • Remind yourself that the core business of a school is about learning. The impact of e-learning is current and relevant for our children. Now is not the time to be an ostrich.
    • There also has to be a level of understanding around how to use the e-learning planning framework.
    • What will e-learning look like in your school?
    • Take time to familiarise yourself with the resource. Set targets to complete sections of the tool.
    • Work through ways to engage whanau and community. This is a particular issue for our community, especially when whanau do not have access to computers, the internet, or have digital literacy.  
    • Staff who are not interested and or confident in IT in this day and age. I work with a couple of staff members who do not engage with computers if they can help it. This is a concern. We can all say “You have to” till the cows come home. It isn’t going to make them do it… Principals have to be able to inspire and be change-agents.
    • Relationships are vital to encourage change for staff.  Be open to change yourself.
    • Jane Gilbert’s presentation at the Hui struck a chord with me.  The last 3 slides of her presentation have particular significance for strategic planning and raising student achievement.

    This statement she makes is important –‘You cannot scaffold in others what you haven’t done yourself

    • Jane also says three key shifts are involved – We - and our students need to
    • think differently
    • engage with each other differently
    • act differently
    • Does the strategic plan include all the necessary components, and is there reference to e-learning? – Check that it does. That is the responsibility of the Principal along with support from the BOT.

    http://www.minedu.govt.nz/NZEducation/EducationPolicies/Schools/SchoolOperations/SchoolFinances/FinancialInformationForSchoolsHandbook/Ch2FinancialGovernance/21StrategicPlanning.aspx

    1. Anticipate 

    2. Think Critically

    3. Interpret 

    4. Decide

    5. Align

    6. Learn

  • Keri Tataurangi 28 Jun 2014 12:54pm () in MLEs: Learning spaces and resourcing | NAPP Kōrero 6

    One of the first things that has to happen is that there needs to be a clear vision for the purpose of the MLEs.  As a Principal, I have to ensure that the BOT, staff, students, whanau and community are very clear about what the MLEs will do for children’s achievement. How will it impact on their learning? What will MLEs bring to enhancing teaching and learning programmes for tamariki? What will an MLE bring to children’s learning and raising student achievement? To that end I have to think about what informs the strategic decision making?

    I have to ask the questions – Will computers and technologies make a difference to the Teaching and Learning programme in our school? Does an MLE need to be a new learning space? What kind of MLE would best suit our learners? Are existing single cell classrooms able to become MLEs without changing the room footprint itself? Lots of questions – As a leader I would have to be open to change, able to access the right PLD to facilitate the staff through change and to never let go of the Teaching and Learning Curriculum and seeing the results of the impact of the MLE.

    I would need a personal philosophy about MLEs and have a level of digital literacy myself. I cannot be a ‘just in time’ leader. I have to keep up to date with current practice and facilitate this up take in learning across the school. There will always be resistance along the way, however if it is your belief and philosophy that MLEs will make a difference to student achievement, then buy-in from the team is vital. Keeping up to date with current practice and looking for evidence to support MLEs is important.

    I think about the 1970’s and Open plan classrooms… This ‘open space’ environment is nothing new. The technologies within the MLEs are. Over the years the walls have been put back up into learning environments. The theory doesn’t always align with the practice. There are so many variables with MLEs to make them work and to be their downfall. The spaces for learning within an MLE are not being designed for people who are here now.

    We have to be mindful that, as Senior Managers, we may be more removed from the classroom than the teachers themselves. Including the coalface/chalkboard/activboard/touch screen teachers themselves in making decisions would be valuable. There are far more tech savvy people in education than me. I have to be aware of the resources available and this requires researching what technologies would benefit the learning for the students.  

    The vision for MLEs must be long term… longer than 3 – 5 years. In this rapidly changing digital world the MLE’s should be able to develop and change with the technologies. The decisions made have to reflect this rather than being done in an ad hock fashion from year to year. This may be one of the biggest challenges to creating MLE’s in schools.

    MLEs need teaching staff who are extremely good at what they do. The teacher has to be open to sharing, working under the scrutiny of others all the time and being a good team member is an understatement. This is not for everyone in our profession. A vitally important consideration for MLEs is the staffing and this all comes down to relationships. Attracting staff who want to work in a MLE and are good at what they do to enhance students learning will be a consideration.

    There are funding complexities when thinking about resourcing MLEs. This needs to be very carefully decided upon and may require funding from outside of the Ministry. I have to have the up to date knowledge about who will fund what, and if I need to be proactive to source extra funding.

    So in summary: Research, ask questions, talk, listen, tutu with the technology, be in the know, have the students’ best learning at the forefront of decision making, have a long term vision.

    One of the first things that has to happen is that there needs to be a clear vision for the purpose of the MLEs.  As a Principal, I have to ensure that the BOT, staff, students, whanau and community are very clear about what the MLEs will do for children’s achievement. How will it impact on their learning? What will MLEs bring to enhancing teaching and learning programmes for tamariki? What will an MLE bring to children’s learning and raising student achievement? To that end I have to think about what informs the strategic decision making?

    I have to ask the questions – Will computers and technologies make a difference to the Teaching and Learning programme in our school? Does an MLE need to be a new learning space? What kind of MLE would best suit our learners? Are existing single cell classrooms able to become MLEs without changing the room footprint itself? Lots of questions – As a leader I would have to be open to change, able to access the right PLD to facilitate the staff through change and to never let go of the Teaching and Learning Curriculum and seeing the results of the impact of the MLE.

    I would need a personal philosophy about MLEs and have a level of digital literacy myself. I cannot be a ‘just in time’ leader. I have to keep up to date with current practice and facilitate this up take in learning across the school. There will always be resistance along the way, however if it is your belief and philosophy that MLEs will make a difference to student achievement, then buy-in from the team is vital. Keeping up to date with current practice and looking for evidence to support MLEs is important.

    I think about the 1970’s and Open plan classrooms… This ‘open space’ environment is nothing new. The technologies within the MLEs are. Over the years the walls have been put back up into learning environments. The theory doesn’t always align with the practice. There are so many variables with MLEs to make them work and to be their downfall. The spaces for learning within an MLE are not being designed for people who are here now.

    We have to be mindful that, as Senior Managers, we may be more removed from the classroom than the teachers themselves. Including the coalface/chalkboard/activboard/touch screen teachers themselves in making decisions would be valuable. There are far more tech savvy people in education than me. I have to be aware of the resources available and this requires researching what technologies would benefit the learning for the students.  

    The vision for MLEs must be long term… longer than 3 – 5 years. In this rapidly changing digital world the MLE’s should be able to develop and change with the technologies. The decisions made have to reflect this rather than being done in an ad hock fashion from year to year. This may be one of the biggest challenges to creating MLE’s in schools.

    MLEs need teaching staff who are extremely good at what they do. The teacher has to be open to sharing, working under the scrutiny of others all the time and being a good team member is an understatement. This is not for everyone in our profession. A vitally important consideration for MLEs is the staffing and this all comes down to relationships. Attracting staff who want to work in a MLE and are good at what they do to enhance students learning will be a consideration.

    There are funding complexities when thinking about resourcing MLEs. This needs to be very carefully decided upon and may require funding from outside of the Ministry. I have to have the up to date knowledge about who will fund what, and if I need to be proactive to source extra funding.

    So in summary: Research, ask questions, talk, listen, tutu with the technology, be in the know, have the students’ best learning at the forefront of decision making, have a long term vision.