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Sean Lyons's discussion posts

  • Sean Lyons 28 Aug 2014 12:08am () in Seeking parental permission for the use of online apps.

    Hello Janet,

    Thanks for giving the topic a "bump"

    I have received quite a lot of feedback in response to this post, and have supplemented that data by approaching a few schools in the course of other work we were doing to produce some quantative data.

    I am now looking into some of the legal aspects of account creation and parental permission.

    My plan is to produce guidance which will form part of the NetSafe Kit for Schools, as well as publishing it here. At the moment I envisage that to be in term 4 this year.

    Thanks again Janet,

    Sean

  • Sean Lyons 24 Jun 2014 9:34am () in Creating digital footprints for others

    I think there are two points here. Firstly, in terms of our process of posting, tagging and sharing and the sharing of others personally identifiable information. What permission do we seek, how much do we involve others in that process, how do we keep track of who see's what? And secondly, what sort of example do we set to those in our families and our wider communities with our activity online? How often do we set up a dichotemy between what we share ourselves, and the "advice" that we give young people about how they interact with others online?

    Thanks for the post Nathaniel, great thought stimulus.

    Sean.

  • Sean Lyons 08 Apr 2014 3:52pm () in Looking for Web Rangers [cross posted from NetSafe Group]

    Hello,

     

    NetSafe and Google NZ have teamed up to launch New Zealand’s first Web Rangers programme, an initiative that offers a practical way to help address cyber-bullying and promote good digital citizenship.

     

    The Web Rangers programme invites teenagers from 14-17 years old to create a campaign that will help their peers think about their online behaviour and keep each other safe online. Around 200 young people will be invited to take part in the project, attending workshops in Wellington, Christchurch and Auckland, where they will receive training from experts in online safety, marketing and social media.

     

    Students will then be given six weeks to produce their campaigns, which can take any form including YouTube videos and other social media content, billboards, and in-school events.  The creators of the top internet safety campaigns from each city win a trip to Google’s HQ in Sydney (with a guardian) to present their campaign to Google executives.  

     

    We would love it if you could encourage students in your school to sign up and take part. They would need to be able to make their way to and attend a holiday workshop at one of these dates:

     

    Wellington Tuesday, April 29

    Christchurch on Wednesday, April 30

    Auckland on Thursday, May 1.

     

    To sign up, students can visit www.netsafe.org.nz/webrangers. Registrations close April 14.

     

    New Zealand’s most popular YouTube star, Jamie Curry of Jamie’s World, is also backing the programme and she has made this video in support.

    If you have any questions about the workshops, or the programme in general, please feel free to contact NetSafe on 0508 NETSAFE or at help@netsafe.org.nz

  • Sean Lyons 08 Apr 2014 3:51pm () in Looking for Web Rangers

    Hello,

    NetSafe and Google NZ have teamed up to launch New Zealand’s first Web Rangers programme, an initiative that offers a practical way to help address cyber-bullying and promote good digital citizenship.

    The Web Rangers programme invites teenagers from 14-17 years old to create a campaign that will help their peers think about their online behaviour and keep each other safe online. Around 200 young people will be invited to take part in the project, attending workshops in Wellington, Christchurch and Auckland, where they will receive training from experts in online safety, marketing and social media.

    Students will then be given six weeks to produce their campaigns, which can take any form including YouTube videos and other social media content, billboards, and in-school events.  The creators of the top internet safety campaigns from each city win a trip to Google’s HQ in Sydney (with a guardian) to present their campaign to Google executives.  

    We would love it if you could encourage students in your school to sign up and take part. They would need to be able to make their way to and attend a holiday workshop at one of these dates:

    Wellington Tuesday, April 29

    Christchurch on Wednesday, April 30

    Auckland on Thursday, May 1.

    To sign up, students can visit www.netsafe.org.nz/webrangers. Registrations close April 14.

    New Zealand’s most popular YouTube star, Jamie Curry of Jamie’s World, is also backing the programme and she has made this video in support.

    If you have any questions about the workshops, or the programme in general, please feel free to contact NetSafe on 0508 NETSAFE or at help@netsafe.org.nz

  • Sean Lyons 26 Mar 2014 11:18pm () in Seeking parental permission for the use of online apps.

    Hello Moana,

    Thanks for the feedback. We will certainly be keeping this group informed as we progress this piece of work.

    Sean.

  • Sean Lyons 18 Mar 2014 3:23pm () in Seeking parental permission for the use of online apps.

    We [NetSafe] are currently taking a look at the types of permission processes that schools have established for students use of school administered online applications, ranging from productivity suites (GAFE, Office365) through to LMS' or even school controlled "social applications" (such as Moodle, Skooville, Edmodo)

    Are you providing some of these accounts for the use of your students? Do you send out permission letters, hold information evenings or amend your existing use agreements to cover their use?

    If this is you, and you'd be prepared to share (in confidence) what you are doing, we would love to hear from you.

    NetSafe will put together an analysis of what the sector is doing, with the eventual aim to prepare some specific advice to guide schools as they navigate through this area.

    You can send us any documentation that you use, or drop us a line to outline your process if that is easier at feedback@netsafe.org.nz

    If you have specific questions relating to this request, then please contact me directly at seanl@netsafe.org.nz

    Thanks in advance,


    Sean Lyons. CTO, NetSafe.

  • Sean Lyons 05 Mar 2014 11:05am () in BYOD policy and terms of use parent/student agreement

    Hello Karen,

    The policy and use agreements have been updates and are available in the new version of the kit, which can be found here;

    http://www.netsafe.org.nz/the-kit/policy-and-use-agreements

    Hope this is of use.

    Sean. NetSafe.

  • Sean Lyons 23 Jan 2014 11:54am () in 'Teaching' Digital Citizenship

    www.mylgp.org.nz

    This is a curated collection of resources by New Zealand educators, that focus on different aspects of digital citizenship, and provides search tools that allow you to breakdown by year level, but also by digital citizenship definition, by NZC key competencies and values and by other keyword criteria.

    You may also find a useful framework to support digital citizenship in your school via the NetSafe Kit for Schools which you can find at netsafe.org.nz/the-kit

    Sean, NetSafe.

  • Sean Lyons 18 Dec 2013 11:32am () in "5 steps to combat cyber-bullying"

    Hello,

    It’s an interesting set of ideas, and the advice is laudable. However, with any advice that we provide, it has to be done in the context of that that is realistic. Because without that context, the advice can become hollow. 

    As an example, let’s look at the first one, "Never Share or post personal information" How realistic is that for young people in our current socially connected environment? We know that young people (and the rest of us) do share personal information, and indeed some of that sharing is part of the "social contract" we enter into when we engage with each other in these spaces. It forms a large part of the social capital that we build as we interact with each other online. If the advice that we give young people is simply "Don't" we run the risk of losing the engagement with them, and perhaps re-enforce the "generational digital divide" as highlighted in the Byron Report.

    To me, this is the difference between traditional cyber safety massaging, and genuine digital citizenship. Where one promotes protectionist strategies (Don't do..., You must not...) the other focusses on the idea that challenge is inevitable and manageable, and that preparation is the key to successfully managing those challenges, to building real resiliency in these spaces.

    It is our belief that experiencing those challenges and learning from them in an authentic context, where knowledgeable guides are able to assist that learning, within a properly constructed protective framework is the only way to help develop successful, digital citizens. This is the basis for the LGP framework. If you want to find out more about the LGP framework, you can visit www.mylgp.org.nz, or look through the NetSafe Kit for Schools at www.netsafe.org.nz/the-kit

    Safe guards are of course important, but only as important as authentic learning around developing digital citizenship skills for the entire community.

    Sean. CTO, NetSafe.

  • Sean Lyons 04 Nov 2013 4:31pm () in Digital citizenship resources to share with parents/whānau

    Hi Tessa. Its interesting to read statements like;

    While schools often have 'blocks' on these, most home computers don't

    We are increasingly engaged in conversations with schools that feel they need the support of their wider communities to assist in the progress of their digital citizenship journeys but are unsure of how the community feels, or are unable to guage how well prepared the community is to provide this support.

    As part of the NetSafe Kit for Schools, we have launched a Community Digital Citizenship Survey, to give schools a chance to begin a conversation with the wider community about where it stands in relation to some key digital citizenship markers. The survey is preprepared, can be issued as a simple URL to the community, and on completion of the survey, NetSafe will provide an analysis of the data for you.

    If schools want to find out more, visit  www.netsafe.org.nz/the-kit/surveys 

    I hope this is of some use.

    Sean. NetSafe.