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Sherlock and Watson... different perspectives

One evening Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson were on a camping trip. After a busy day, a relaxing dinner (of freshly caught fish, washed down with a bottle of wine, they doused the fire and retired for the night.

Some hours later, Holmes awoke. He nudged his faithful friend, until he too was awake.

"Watson," he said, "look up and tell me what you see."

Watson replied, "I see millions of stars."

Holmes then asked, "And what does that tell you?"

Watson pondered for a minute, then replied...

"Well... Astronomically speaking, it tells me that there are galaxies filled with millions of stars and potentially billions of planets."
"Astrologically speaking, I observe that Saturn is in Leo, which could mean good luck all round."
"Horologically, I deduce that the time is approximately a quarter past three."
"Theologically, I can see that God is all powerful and that we are small and insignificant."
"Meteorologically, I conclude that after a sharp frost, we will have a beautiful day tomorrow."

There was a momentary silence which prompted Watson to ask Holmes,
"Why? What does it tell you?"

Holmes was silent for a few seconds.

"Watson," he replied, 

"Someone has stolen our tent!"

Comments

  • Paul Ashman

    I do like the different lenses happening here! Besides the punchline that is!

    How do we ensure that our children can carry these different 'dispositions' and know how/when/where to use them?

  • Helen Ramsdale

    At gifted kids, we used to do 'ignorance logging' which meant writing down things we didn't know and updating it when we discovered them. We also came across things we didn't know we didn't know... (not a typo). I guess it might benefit us to let kids explore what they are interested in the most and be more structured around what they are less interested in so they build a solid knowledge base but also have the opportunity to become engrossed or mini experts in particular areas. Thinking out loud... maybe this is good for a discussion point.